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The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)

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  • MARK WOODEN
  • NICOLE WATSON

Abstract

The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is Australia's first nationally representative household panel survey. This article reviews the achievements of the HILDA Survey since its inception in 2001. It briefly describes the design of the survey and the data collection process, provides summary statistics about response and respondent characteristics, and reviews key research findings that have been published using the first four waves of data.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Wooden & Nicole Watson, 2007. "The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 208-231, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:83:y:2007:i:261:p:208-231
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4932.2007.00395.x
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