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The Effect of Local Area Crime on Mental Health

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  • Christian Dustmann

    (University College London)

  • Francesco Fasani

    (Queen Mary University)

Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of local crime rates on residents’ mental health. Using longitudinal information on individuals’ mental well-being, we address the problem of sorting and endogenous moving behaviour. We find that crime causes considerable mental distress for residents, mainly driven by property crime. Effects are stronger for females, and mainly related to depression and anxiety. The distress caused by one standard deviation increase in local crime is 2-4 times larger than that caused by a one standard deviation decrease in local employment, and about one seventh of the short-term impact of the 7 July 2005 London Bombings.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Dustmann & Francesco Fasani, 2014. "The Effect of Local Area Crime on Mental Health," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1428, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1428
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    neighbourhoodeffects; mentalwellbeing; fearofcrime;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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