IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/hlthec/v19y2010i4p396-421.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Mental illness, nativity, gender and labor supply

Author

Listed:
  • Victoria D. Ojeda

    (Division of Global Public Health, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA)

  • Richard G. Frank

    (Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA)

  • Thomas G. McGuire

    (Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA)

  • Todd P. Gilmer

    (Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine La Jolla, CA, USA)

Abstract

We analyzed the impacts of nativity and mental health (MH) on work by gender for non-elderly adults using the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. We employed two indicators of MH - the K6 scale of Mental Illness (MI) and an indicator for symptoms of Mania or Delusions (M|D). Instrumental variable (IV) models used measures of social support as instruments for MI. Unadjusted work rates were higher for immigrants (vs US-born adults). Regressions show that MI is associated with lower rates of work among US-born males but not immigrant males and females; M|D is associated lower rates of work among US-born males and females, and among immigrant males. Results did not change using IV models for MI. Most persons with MI work, yet symptom severity reduces labor supply among natives especially. Immigrants' labor supply is less affected by MI. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Victoria D. Ojeda & Richard G. Frank & Thomas G. McGuire & Todd P. Gilmer, 2010. "Mental illness, nativity, gender and labor supply," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 396-421.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:396-421
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1480
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1480
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Goldin, Claudia, 1992. "Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195072709.
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2006.091892_4 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Currie, Janet & Madrian, Brigitte C., 1999. "Health, health insurance and the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 50, pages 3309-3416 Elsevier.
    4. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1999:89:10:1543-1548_8 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Susan L. Ettner & Richard G. Frank & Ronald C. Kessler, 1997. "The Impact of Psychiatric Disorders on Labor Market Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 5989, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Bartel, Ann & Taubman, Paul, 1979. "Health and Labor Market Success: The Role of Various Diseases," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(1), pages 1-8, February.
    7. Pinka Chatterji & Margarita Alegría & Mingshan Lu & David Takeuchi, 2007. "Psychiatric disorders and labor market outcomes: evidence from the National Latino and Asian American Study," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(10), pages 1069-1090.
    8. Vivian H. Hamilton & Philip Merrigan & Éric Dufresne, 1997. "Down and out: estimating the relationship between mental health and unemployment," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 397-406.
    9. Bartel, Ann & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "Some Economic and Demographic Consequences of Mental Illness," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(2), pages 243-256, April.
    10. Richard Frank & Paul Gertler, 1991. "An Assessment of Measurement Error Bias for Estimating the Effect of Mental Distress on Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 154-164.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Baert, Stijn & De Visschere, Sarah & Schoors, Koen & Vandenberghe, Désirée & Omey, Eddy, 2016. "First depressed, then discriminated against?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 170(C), pages 247-254.
    2. Gail Pacheco & Dom Page & Don Webber, 2012. "Mental and physical health: reconceptualising the relationship with employment propensity," Working Papers 20121206, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Myung Ki & Yvonne Kelly & Amanda Sacker & James Nazroo, 2013. "Poor health, employment transitions and gender: evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(4), pages 537-546, August.
    4. Lizhong Peng & Chad D. Meyerhoefer & Samuel H. Zuvekas, 2016. "The Short‐Term Effect of Depressive Symptoms on Labor Market Outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(10), pages 1223-1238, October.
    5. Noonan, Kelly & Corman, Hope & Reichman, Nancy E., 2016. "Effects of maternal depression on family food insecurity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 201-215.
    6. Perera, G. & Di Gessa, G. & Corna, L. M. & Glaser, K. & Stewart, R., 2017. "Paid employment and common mental disorders in 50–64-year olds: analysis of three cross-sectional nationally representative survey samples in 1993, 2000 and 2007," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 84652, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:396-421. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.