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First Depressed, Then Discriminated Against?

Author

Listed:
  • Baert, Stijn

    () (Ghent University)

  • De Visschere, Sarah

    (Ghent University)

  • Schoors, Koen

    () (Ghent University)

  • Omey, Eddy

    () (Ghent University)

Abstract

This study assesses hiring discrimination based on disclosed depression. We send out pairs of job applications from fictitious unemployed candidates to real vacancies in Belgium. Within each pair, one candidate cites depression as the reason for her/his unemployment, whereas the other candidate reveals no reason for unemployment. Overall, the hypothesis that applicants disclosing former depression are treated unfavourably is rejected. However, if we break up the data by the gender of the recruiter, we see that revealing former depression as a reason for unemployment is rewarded by female recruiters, whereas it affects the hiring decisions made by male recruiters in a non-positive way.

Suggested Citation

  • Baert, Stijn & De Visschere, Sarah & Schoors, Koen & Omey, Eddy, 2014. "First Depressed, Then Discriminated Against?," IZA Discussion Papers 8320, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8320
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Emmanuel Duguet & Rémi Le Gall & Yannick L'horthy & Pascale Petit, 2018. "How does labor market history influence the access to hiring interviews?," Working Papers halshs-01878933, HAL.
    2. Sharipova, Adelina & Baert, Stijn, 2019. "Labour Market Outcomes for Cancer Survivors: A Review of the Reviews," GLO Discussion Paper Series 436, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Van Belle, Eva & Caers, Ralf & De Couck, Marijke & Di Stasio, Valentina & Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Why Is Unemployment Duration a Sorting Criterion in Hiring?," IZA Discussion Papers 10876, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Maurer-Fazio, Margaret & Wang, Sili, 2018. "Does Marital Status Affect How Firms Interpret Job Applicants' Un/Employment Histories?," IZA Discussion Papers 11363, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Hiring Discrimination: An Overview of (Almost) All Correspondence Experiments Since 2005," IZA Discussion Papers 10738, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    field experiments; hiring discrimination; economics of health; depression;

    JEL classification:

    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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