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The employability of ex-offenders: a field experiment in the Swedish labor market

Author

Listed:
  • Ali M. Ahmed

    () (Linköping University)

  • Elisabeth Lång

    () (Linköping University)

Abstract

Abstract This paper presents the findings of a field experiment on hiring discrimination against ex-offenders in the Swedish labor market. Matched pairs of written job applications for fictitious male and female applicants with and without a past conviction of assault were sent to employers for nine different occupations. Results show that discrimination against ex-offenders exists, but the extent of it varies across occupations. The past conviction of assault was associated with 7–18 percentage point lower probability of receiving a positive employer response. Discrimination against ex-offenders was pronounced in female-dominated and high-skilled occupations. The magnitude of discrimination against ex-offenders did not vary by applicants’ sex.

Suggested Citation

  • Ali M. Ahmed & Elisabeth Lång, 2017. "The employability of ex-offenders: a field experiment in the Swedish labor market," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-23, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izalpo:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40173-017-0084-2
    DOI: 10.1186/s40173-017-0084-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ex-offenders; Field experiments; Labor market discrimination;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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