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Evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Swedish labor market using experimental data

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  • Carlsson, Magnus
  • Rooth, Dan-Olof

Abstract

We present experimental evidence for recruitment discrimination against men with an Arabic sounding name. Our results show that every fourth employer discriminates against the minority. However, simulations indicate that ethnic discrimination is only responsible for less than one sixth of the native-immigrant unemployment gap. We extend previous analyses using this method by interviewing employers. We find that discriminatory employers have, to a greater extent, a male responsible for recruitment and a share of male employees greater than 35 percent. Firms that have an ethnic multitude plan were not found to discriminate less than other firms.
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Suggested Citation

  • Carlsson, Magnus & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "Evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Swedish labor market using experimental data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 716-729, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:14:y:2007:i:4:p:716-729
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James J. Heckman, 1998. "Detecting Discrimination," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 101-116, Spring.
    2. Altonji, Joseph G. & Blank, Rebecca M., 1999. "Race and gender in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 48, pages 3143-3259, Elsevier.
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    4. Carlsson, Magnus & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "Evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Swedish labor market using experimental data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 716-729, August.
    5. Mortensen, Dale T., 1987. "Job search and labor market analysis," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 15, pages 849-919, Elsevier.
    6. Weichselbaumer, Doris, 2003. "Sexual orientation discrimination in hiring," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 629-642, December.
    7. Edin, Per-Anders & Lagerström, Jonas, 2006. "Blind dates: quasi-experimental evidence on discrimination," Working Paper Series 2006:4, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    8. Olof Åslund & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2005. "Shifts in attitudes and labor market discrimination: Swedish experiences after 9-11," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 603-629, November.
    9. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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