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Criminal stigma, race, and ethnicity: The consequences of imprisonment for employment

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  • Decker, Scott H.
  • Ortiz, Natalie
  • Spohn, Cassia
  • Hedberg, Eric

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role of race/ethnicity and prior prison sentences on employment opportunities. Secondarily, we compare the impact of applying for jobs (in-person and online), and the role of education in securing employment. This work was conducted in a large southwestern city (Phoenix AZ) with high rates of imprisonment for blacks and Hispanics.

Suggested Citation

  • Decker, Scott H. & Ortiz, Natalie & Spohn, Cassia & Hedberg, Eric, 2015. "Criminal stigma, race, and ethnicity: The consequences of imprisonment for employment," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 108-121.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcjust:v:43:y:2015:i:2:p:108-121
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2015.02.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Devah Pager, 2003. "The mark of a criminal record," Natural Field Experiments 00319, The Field Experiments Website.
    2. Ayres, Ian & Siegelman, Peter, 1995. "Race and Gender Discrimination in Bargaining for a New Car," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 304-321, June.
    3. Waldfogel, Joel, 1994. "Does conviction have a persistent effect on income and employment?," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 103-119, March.
    4. Pager, Devah & Western, Bruce & Bonikowski, Bart, 2009. "Discrimination in a Low-Wage Labor Market: A Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 4469, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Richard B. Freeman, 1994. "Crime and the Job Market," NBER Working Papers 4910, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    7. Marc Bendick & Charles Jackson & Victor Reinoso, 1994. "Measuring employment discrimination through controlled experiments," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 25-48, June.
    8. Betsey Stevenson, 2009. "The Internet and Job Search," NBER Chapters, in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 67-86, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Alice O. Nakamura & Kathryn L. Shaw & Richard B. Freeman & Emi Nakamura & Amanda Pyman, 2009. "Jobs Online," NBER Chapters, in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 27-65, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Button, Patrick & Walker, Brigham, 2019. "Employment Discrimination against Indigenous Peoples in the United States: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 12131, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Ali M. Ahmed & Elisabeth Lång, 2017. "The employability of ex-offenders: a field experiment in the Swedish labor market," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-23, December.
    3. John Stuart Batchelder & Austin O’Neill & Ashley Diane Rodriguez & Rebecca Tibbs, 2018. "Overcoming the Barriers to Successful Completion of GED Programs among Prison and Jail Inmates," International Journal of Social Science Studies, Redfame publishing, vol. 6(1), pages 1-6, January.
    4. Amanda Agan & Sonja Starr, 2016. "Ban the Box, Criminal Records, and Statistical Discrimination: A Field Experiment," Working Papers 598, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    5. Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Hiring Discrimination: An Overview of (Almost) All Correspondence Experiments Since 2005," GLO Discussion Paper Series 61, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    6. Gaddis, S. Michael, 2018. "An Introduction to Audit Studies in the Social Sciences," SocArXiv e5hfc, Center for Open Science.
    7. Zschirnt, Eva & Ruedin, Didier, 2016. "Ethnic discrimination in hiring decisions: A meta-analysis of correspondence tests 1990–2015," EconStor Preprints 142176, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    8. Yemane, Ruta & Fernández-Reino, Mariña, 2019. "Latinos in the United States and in Spain: the impact of ethnic group stereotypes on labour market outcomes," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-21.

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