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College Major, Internship Experience, and Employment Opportunities: Estimates from a Résumé Audit

Listed author(s):
  • John M. Nunley
  • Adam Pugh
  • Nicholas Romero
  • Richard Alan Seals, Jr.

We use experimental data from a résumé audit to estimate the impact of particular college majors and internship experience on employment prospects. Despite applying exclusively to business-related job openings, we find no evidence that business degrees improve employment prospects. By contrast, internship experience increases the interview rate by 14 percent. The returns to internship experience are larger for (a) nonbusiness majors and (b) applicants with high academic ability. Our data support signaling as the most likely explanation for the effect of internships on employment opportunities.

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File URL: http://cla.auburn.edu/econwp/Archives/2015/2015-09.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Auburn University in its series Auburn Economics Working Paper Series with number auwp2015-09.

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Date of creation: Jul 2015
Handle: RePEc:abn:wpaper:auwp2015-09
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0326 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5049

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Web page: http://cla.auburn.edu/economics/

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