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Are recent college graduates finding good jobs?

  • Abel, Jaison R.

    ()

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Deitz, Richard

    ()

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Su, Yaquin

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

According to numerous accounts, the Great Recession has left many recent college graduates struggling to find jobs that utilize their education. However, a look at the data on the employment outcomes for recent graduates over the past two decades suggests that such difficulties are not a new phenomenon: individuals just beginning their careers often need time to transition into the labor market. Still, the percentage who are unemployed or “underemployed”—working in a job that typically does not require a bachelor’s degree—has risen, particularly since the 2001 recession. Moreover, the quality of the jobs held by the underemployed has declined, with today’s recent graduates increasingly accepting low-wage jobs or working part-time.

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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its journal Current Issues in Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 20 (2014)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:00001
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  1. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2014. "A Major in Science? Initial Beliefs and Final Outcomes for College Major and Dropout," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(1), pages 426-472.
  2. Arcidiacono, Peter, 2002. "Ability Sorting and the Returns to College Major," Working Papers 02-26, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  3. Basit Zafar, 2011. "How Do College Students Form Expectations?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(2), pages 301 - 348.
  4. Paul Beadry & Paul Beaudry & David A. Green & Ben Sand, 2013. "The great reversal in the demand for skill and cognitive tasks," STICERD - Public Economics Programme Discussion Papers 22, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  5. Kahn, Lisa B., 2010. "The long-term labor market consequences of graduating from college in a bad economy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 303-316, April.
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