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The effect of non-standard employment on mental health in Britain

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  • Bardasi, Elena
  • Francesconi, Marco

Abstract

We examine the impact of moving home, the distance moved and reasons for moving on both household income and labour market earnings for a representative sample of individuals using panel data. Our results suggest that there are monetary returns to migration which apply to both household income and labour market earnings. However, not all migrants enjoy these returns, which depend on distance moved, family structure, and the employment situation of other family members. Further, returns to migration may not be enjoyed for some time after the move, emphasising the need for panel data in studies of residential mobilty. Using data that are too recent relative to the time of migration will yield misleading results and underestimate the size of the premium attributable to residential mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Bardasi, Elena & Francesconi, Marco, 2000. "The effect of non-standard employment on mental health in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-37, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2000-37
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Llena-Nozal & Maarten Lindeboom & France Portrait, 2004. "The effect of work on mental health: does occupation matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 1045-1062.
    2. Andrew M. Bryce, 2019. "Weekend working in 21st century Britain:Does it matter for well-being?," Working Papers 2019007, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    3. Rafael Sánchez, 2017. "Does a Mandatory Reduction of Standard Working Hours Improve Employees' Health Status?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 3-39, January.
    4. van Praag, Bernard M. S. & Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2001. "Age-Differentiated QALY Losses," IZA Discussion Papers 314, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Moreno Baruffini & Federica Origo, 2014. "Job satisfaction and flexicurity over the business cycle: evidence from Swiss individual-level data," ERSA conference papers ersa14p366, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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