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Immigrants and the labor Market

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  • james smith

    (rand corporation)

Abstract

This paper deals with a number of issues about immigrants to the United States and their education. In part reflecting the reasons why they come in America, immigrants are more highly represented in both the lowest and highest rungs of the education ladder. On average immigrants have less schooling than the native born, a schooling deficit that reached 1.3 years in 2002. Perhaps as important as the average difference between immigrants and the native-born population, there is considerable diversity in the schooling accomplishments among different immigrant sub-groups. The education of new European and Asian immigrants is higher than that of native-born Americans, while the typical Latino immigrant continues to trail the native-born by about four years of schooling on average. The education gap of new recent immigrants did rise modestly over the last 60 years. This increase was higher among men than among women and is entirely accounted for the increasing fraction of immigrants who are illegal. Legal immigrants appear to have about the same amount of schooling as native-born Americans do, and in the top of the schooling hierarchy have a good deal more. Finally, I find that the concern that educational generational progress among Latino immigrants has lagged behind other immigrant groups is largely unfounded.

Suggested Citation

  • james smith, 2005. "Immigrants and the labor Market," Labor and Demography 0511004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0511004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:sae:ilrrev:v:70:y:2017:i:5:p:1146-1175 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo, 2017. "The Complexity of Immigrant Generations: Implications for Assessing the Socioeconomic Integration of Hispanics and Asians," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 70(5), pages 1146-1175, October.
    3. Christian Dustmann & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2010. "Ethnic minority immigrants and their children in Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(2), pages 209-233, April.
    4. George J. Borjas & Rachel M. Friedberg, 2009. "Recent Trends in the Earnings of New Immigrants to the United States," Working Papers 2009-13, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    5. Brian Duncan & Jeffrey Grogger & Ana Sofia Leon & Stephen J. Trejo, 2017. "New Evidence of Generational Progress for Mexican Americans," Working Papers 2017-089, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    6. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:1311-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Pope, Nolan G., 2016. "The Effects of DACAmentation: The Impact of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on Unauthorized Immigrants," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 98-114.
    8. Pylypchuk, Yuriy, 2009. "Effects of immigration on the health insurance status of natives," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 1028-1037, September.
    9. Timothy Hatton & Andrew Leigh, 2011. "Immigrants assimilate as communities, not just as individuals," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 389-419, April.
    10. Sarah Bohn, 2010. "The quantity and quality of new immigrants to the US," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 29-51, March.
    11. Carolyn Moehling & Anne Piehl, 2014. "Immigrant assimilation into US prisons, 1900–1930," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 173-200, January.
    12. Nong Zhu & Cecile Batisse, 2014. "Croissance, inégalités et pauvreté : le cas des immigrants au Canada," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-11, CIRANO.
    13. repec:eee:chieco:v:46:y:2017:i:c:p:67-86 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan, 2017. "Immigration in American Economic History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1311-1345, December.
    15. Green, David A. & Worswick, Christopher, 2012. "Immigrant earnings profiles in the presence of human capital investment: Measuring cohort and macro effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 241-259.
    16. Ostrovsky, Yuri, 2008. "Inegalite et instabilite des gains chez les immigrants au Canada," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2008309f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    17. Lundborg, Per & Skedinger, Per, 2014. "Employer Attitudes towards Refugee Immigrants," Working Paper Series 1025, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    18. repec:bla:indres:v:56:y:2017:i:3:p:459-488 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Jens Ruhose, 2013. "Bildungsleistungen von Migranten und deren Determinanten – Teil II: Primar-, Sekundar- und Tertiärbereich," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(10), pages 24-38, May.
    20. Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo, 2018. "Socioeconomic Integration of U.S. Immigrant Groups over the Long Term: The Second Generation and Beyond," NBER Working Papers 24394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Aimee Chin & Chinhui Juhn, 2010. "Does Reducing College Costs Improve Educational Outcomes for Undocumented Immigrants? Evidence from State Laws Permitting Undocumented Immigrants to Pay In-state Tuition at State Colleges and Universi," NBER Working Papers 15932, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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