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The Effect Of Work Status And Working Conditions On Mental Health In Four Oecd Countries

Author

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  • Ana Llena-Nozal

    (OECD, Ana.Llena-Nozal@oecd.org)

Abstract

This study aims to assess empirically whether being employed or returning to work is beneficial for all in terms of mental health, especially for those who already suffer from a longstanding illness or disability. We use longitudinal surveys from Australia, Canada, Switzerland and the UK to estimate panel data models that link decisions regarding labour market choices to health developments. To allow for state dependence of mental health, a dynamic panel model is used. The longitudinal analysis shows that non-employment generally is worse for mental health than working. The mental-health payoff to employment varies depending on the type of employment contract and working conditions. In particular, the mental health benefits for inactive individuals who obtain a non-standard job appear to be smaller than for those moving into standard employment arrangements, even after controlling for pre-existing mental health problems.

Suggested Citation

  • Ana Llena-Nozal, 2009. "The Effect Of Work Status And Working Conditions On Mental Health In Four Oecd Countries," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 209(1), pages 72-87, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:niesru:v:209:y:2009:i:1:p:72-87
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. KURODA Sachiko & YAMAMOTO Isamu, 2016. "Workers' Mental Health, Long Work Hours, and Workplace Management: Evidence from workers' longitudinal data in Japan," Discussion papers 16017, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. Francis Green, 2020. "Health effects of job insecurity," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 212-212, December.
    3. Bassanini, Andrea & Caroli, Eve, 2014. "Is work bad for health? The role of constraint vs choice," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1402, CEPREMAP.
    4. Thomas Barnay, 2016. "Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(6), pages 693-709, July.
    5. Elena Cottini & Claudio Lucifora, 2013. "Mental Health and Working Conditions in Europe," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 66(4), pages 958-988, July.
    6. Nicolas Sirven & Thomas Barnay, 2017. "Expectations, loss aversion and retirement decisions in the context of the 2009 crisis in Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 25-44, April.
    7. Clémentine Garrouste & Mathilde Godard, 2016. "The lasting health impact of leaving school in a bad economy : Britons in the 1970s recession," Post-Print hal-01408637, HAL.
    8. Megan Woods & Rob Macklin & Sarah Dawkins & Angela Martin, 2019. "Mental Illness, Social Suffering and Structural Antagonism in the Labour Process," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 33(6), pages 948-965, December.
    9. Eric Delattre & Richard K. Moussa & Mareva Sabatier, 2019. "Health condition and job status interactions: econometric evidence of causality from a French longitudinal survey," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-18, December.
    10. Sara Rellstab & Marco Pecoraro & Alberto Holly & Philippe Wanner & Karine Renard, 2016. "The Migrant Health Gap and the Role of Labour Market Status: Evidence from Switzerland," IRENE Working Papers 16-14, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    11. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Wunder, Christoph, 2018. "Do working hours affect health? Evidence from statutory workweek regulations in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 162-171.
    12. Atsuko Tanaka & Laurel Beck, "undated". "Mental Well-being of the Bereaved and Labor Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2015-24, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 19 Nov 2015.
    13. Clémentine Garrouste & Mathilde Godard, 2015. "The Lasting Health Impact of Leaving School in a Bad Economy: Britons in the 1970s Recession," Working Papers halshs-01521916, HAL.
    14. Clementine Garrouste & Mathilde Godard, 2016. "The Lasting Health Impact of Leaving School in a Bad Economy: Britons in the 1970s Recession," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(S2), pages 70-92, November.
    15. repec:dau:papers:123456789/14542 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Rafael Sánchez, 2017. "Does a Mandatory Reduction of Standard Working Hours Improve Employees' Health Status?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 3-39, January.
    17. Elena Cottini & Paolo Ghinetti, 2018. "Employment insecurity and employees' health in Denmark," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 426-439, February.
    18. Andrén, Daniela, 2010. "Part-time Sick Leave as a Treatment for Individuals with Mental Disorders?," Working Papers 2010:17, Örebro University, School of Business.
    19. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
    20. Oana-Ramona Socoliuc (Guriță) & Nicoleta Sîrghi & Dănuţ-Vasile Jemna & Mihaela David, 2022. "Corruption and Population Health in the European Union Countries—An Institutionalist Perspective," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(9), pages 1-20, April.
    21. Kamila Cygam-Rehm & Christoph Wunder, 2018. "Do Working Hours Affect Health? Evidence from Statutory Workweek Regulations in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 967, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    22. repec:dau:papers:123456789/12483 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Kamila Cygan-Rehm & Christoph Wunder, 2018. "Do Working Hours Affect Health? Evidence from Statutory Workweek Regulations in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 7098, CESifo.

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