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Health condition and job status interactions: econometric evidence of causality from a French longitudinal survey

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  • Eric Delattre

    (ThEMA, Université de Cergy-Pontoise)

  • Richard K. Moussa

    (Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Statistique et d’Economie Appliquée)

  • Mareva Sabatier

    (IREGE, Université de Savoie)

Abstract

This article investigates the causal links between health and employment status. To disentangle correlation from causality effects, the authors leverage a French panel survey to estimate a bivariate dynamic probit model that can account for the persistence effect, initial conditions, and unobserved heterogeneity. The results highlight the crucial role of all three components and reveal strong dual causality between health and employment status. The findings clearly support demands for better coordination between employment and health public policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Delattre & Richard K. Moussa & Mareva Sabatier, 2019. "Health condition and job status interactions: econometric evidence of causality from a French longitudinal survey," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-18, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:hecrev:v:9:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1186_s13561-019-0220-3
    DOI: 10.1186/s13561-019-0220-3
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health and job causality; Bivariate dynamic probit model; Gauss-Hermite quadrature;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation

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