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Dynamics of Work-Limitation and Work in Australia

Author

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  • Umut Oguzoglu

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of self-reported work-limitation on the employment of the Australian working age population. Five consecutive waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey are used to investigate this relationship. A two-equation dynamic panel data model demonstrates that persistence and unobserved heterogeneity play an important role in the work-limitation reporting and its effect on work. Unobserved factors that jointly drive work-limitation and work are also shown to be crucial, especially for women.

Suggested Citation

  • Umut Oguzoglu, 2007. "Dynamics of Work-Limitation and Work in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2007n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2007n10
    as

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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2007n10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jones, Melanie K. & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Sloane, Peter J. & Wei, Zhang, 2015. "The Dynamic Effect of Disability on Work and Subjective Wellbeing in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 9609, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Chiara Mussida & Dario Sciulli, 2015. "Direct and indirect effects of disability on employment probabilities: a comparative analysis," DISCE - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali dises1507, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    3. Umut Oguzoglu, 2016. "Disability and Multi-State Labour Force Choices with State Dependence," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(296), pages 28-46, March.
    4. Oguzoglu, Umut, 2012. "Dynamics of Disability and Work in Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 6603, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i::p:86-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Chiara Mussida & Dario Sciulli, 2016. "Disability and employment across Central and Eastern European Countries," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-24, December.
    7. Cai, Lixin & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Oguzoglu, Umut, 2008. "The Effects of Health and Health Shocks on Hours Worked," IZA Discussion Papers 3496, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Massimiliano Agovino & Agnese Rapposelli, 2017. "Macroeconomic impact of flexicurity on the integration of people with disabilities into the labour market. A two-regime spatial autoregressive analysis," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 307-334, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Work-limitations; dynamic panel probit; Maximum Simulated Likelihood;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access

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