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Dynamics of Disability and Work in Canada

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  • Oguzoglu, Umut

    () (University of Manitoba)

Abstract

Canadian disability policy has come a long way in the past century. However, in contrast with the evidence that disability is not permanent for most, current disability support programs still carry the old static view of permanent disability. By employing a dynamic panel data model of labour force participation, the findings of this paper suggest that labour force exposure is crucial for better return-to-work outcomes for persons with a disability. Without labour force exposure, the effect of a temporary disability is prolonged and participation efforts of the disabled community are slowed down.

Suggested Citation

  • Oguzoglu, Umut, 2012. "Dynamics of Disability and Work in Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 6603, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6603
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Bound & Michael Schoenbaum & Timothy Waidmann, 1995. "Race and Education Differences in Disability Status and Labor Force Attachment," NBER Working Papers 5159, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Cai, Lixin, 2010. "The relationship between health and labour force participation: Evidence from a panel data simultaneous equation model," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 77-90, January.
    3. Jon Harkness, 1993. "Labour Force Participation by Disabled Males in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 26(4), pages 878-889, November.
    4. Maki, Dennis R, 1993. "The Economic Implications of Disability Insurance in Canada," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 148-169, January.
    5. Doreen Wing Han Au & Thomas F. Crossley & Martin Schellhorn, 2005. "The effect of health changes and long-term health on the work activity of older Canadians," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(10), pages 999-1018.
    6. Kapteyn, Arie & Smith, James P. & van Soest, Arthur, 2008. "Dynamics of work disability and pain," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 496-509, March.
    7. Umut Oguzoglu, 2010. "Dynamics of work limitation and work in Australia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 656-669.
    8. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
    9. Brenda Gannon & Brian Nolan, 2004. "Disability and Labour Force Participation in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 35(2), pages 135-155.
    10. Wallace K. C. Mok & Bruce D. Meyer & Kerwin Kofi Charles & Alexandra C. Achen, 2008. "A Note on "The Longitudinal Structure of Earnings Losses among Work-Limited Disabled Workers"," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 721-728.
    11. Umut Oguzoglu, 2012. "Is there a better measure of self-assessed disability?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(14), pages 1335-1338, September.
    12. Steven Stern, 1989. "Measuring the Effect of Disability on Labor Force Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 361-395.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jones, Melanie K. & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Sloane, Peter J. & Wei, Zhang, 2015. "The Dynamic Effect of Disability on Work and Subjective Wellbeing in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 9609, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Jones, Melanie K. & McVicar, Duncan, 2017. "The Dynamics of Disability and Benefit Receipt in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 11186, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    disability; labour force participation; dynamic panel data models;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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