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Institutions, health shocks and labour market outcomes across Europe

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  • García-Gómez, Pilar

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between health shocks and labour market outcomes in 9 European countries using the European Community Household Panel. Matching techniques are used to control for the non-experimental nature of the data. The results suggest that there is a significant causal effect from health on the probability of employment: individuals who incur a health shock are significantly more likely to leave employment and transit into disability. The estimates differ across countries, with the largest employment effects being found in The Netherlands, Denmark, Spain and Ireland, and the smallest in France and Italy. Differences in social security arrangements help to explain these cross-country differences.

Suggested Citation

  • García-Gómez, Pilar, 2011. "Institutions, health shocks and labour market outcomes across Europe," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 200-213, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:1:p:200-213
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Antoine Marsaudon & Lise Rochaix, 2017. "Impact of acute health shocks on cigarette consumption
      [Impact d'un choc de santé sur la consommation de cigarette]
      ," PSE Working Papers halshs-01626024, HAL.
    2. Thomas Barnay, 2016. "Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(6), pages 693-709, July.
    3. Thomas Barnay & Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche & Mathieu Narcy & Yann Videau, 2014. "L’impact du handicap sur les trajectoires d’emploi : une comparaison public-privé," Working Papers hal-01076896, HAL.
    4. Nicolas Sirven & Thomas Barnay, 2017. "Expectations, loss aversion and retirement decisions in the context of the 2009 crisis in Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 25-44, April.
    5. Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Francesca Zantomio, 2016. "Acute health shocks and labour market outcomes," Working Papers 2016:09, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    6. González Álvarez, Mª Luz & Gamero-Burón, Carlos, 2013. "Coste de las visitas médicas y urgencias asociadas al estrés laboral en España/Health Care Costs Due to Job Stress in Spain," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 417-444, Septiembr.
    7. Halla, Martin & Zweimüller, Martina, 2013. "The effect of health on earnings: Quasi-experimental evidence from commuting accidents," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 23-38.
    8. Zucchelli, E. & Harris, M. & Zhao, X., 2012. "Ill-health and transitions to part-time work and self-employment among older workers," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Allanson, Paul & Petrie, Dennis, 2013. "Longitudinal methods to investigate the role of health determinants in the dynamics of income-related health inequality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 922-937.
    10. Antoine Marsaudon & Lise Rochaix, 2010. "Impact of acute health shocks on cigarette consumption: A combined DiD-matching strategy to address endogeneity issues in the French Gazel panel data," PSE Working Papers halshs-01626187, HAL.
    11. ZHAO Meng (KONISHI Moe), 2017. "Health-Related Income Gaps and the Effectiveness of Redistributive Policies in Japan," Discussion papers 17039, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    12. Jones, Melanie K. & McVicar, Duncan, 2017. "The Dynamics of Disability and Benefit Receipt in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 11186, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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