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The impact of diabetes on adult employment and earnings of Mexican Americans: Findings from a community based study

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  • Elena Bastida

    (Department of Sociology and Center on Aging and Health, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, The University of Texas-Pan American, USA)

  • José A. Pagán

    (Department of Economics and Finance, College of Business Administration, The University of Texas-Pan American, USA)

Abstract

Epidemiological studies indicate that minority populations in the US - including African Americans, Native Americans and Mexican Americans - are particularly at risk for diabetes and that their complications are more frequent and severe. Using microdata from a 1994-1999 population based study of middle aged and older Mexican Americans in the Southwest, this study analyzes the impact of diabetes on the employment and earnings outcomes of adults 45 years of age and older. The empirical results from estimating maximum likelihood employment and earnings models suggest that diabetes leads to lower productivity and earnings for women but has no statistically significant impact on their employment probability. In the case of men, however, diabetes leads to a lower employment propensity but has no effect on earnings. Thus, the problems associated with this condition could lead to potential future financial difficulties particularly for high-risk populations in their later years. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Bastida & José A. Pagán, 2002. "The impact of diabetes on adult employment and earnings of Mexican Americans: Findings from a community based study," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(5), pages 403-413.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:11:y:2002:i:5:p:403-413
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.676
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Abid A. Burki & Mushtaq A. Khan & Sobia Malik, 2015. "From Chronic Disease to Food Poverty: Evidence from Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 54(1), pages 17-33.
    2. Persson, Sofie & Dahlquist, Gisela & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Steen Carlsson, Katarina, 2014. "Childhood Health and Labor Market Outcomes in the Case of Type 1 Diabetes," Working Papers 2014:43, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    3. LEVASSEUR Pierre, 2015. "Causal effects of socioeconomic status on central adiposity: Evidence using panel data from urban Mexico," Cahiers du GREThA 2015-09, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    4. Minor, Travis & MacEwan, Joanna P., 2016. "A comparison of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes patients and labor supply," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 14-25.
    5. Seuring, Till & Goryakin, Yevgeniy & Suhrcke, Marc, 2015. "The impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 85-100.
    6. Till Seuring & Olga Archangelidi & Marc Suhrcke, 2015. "The Economic Costs of Type 2 Diabetes: A Global Systematic Review," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 33(8), pages 811-831, August.
    7. Persson, Sofie & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Steen Carlsson, Katarina, 2016. "Labor market consequences of childhood onset type 1 diabetes," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 180-192.
    8. Eric Delattre & Richard Moussa & Mareva Sabatier, 2015. "Health condition and job status interactions: Econometric evidence of causality from a French longitudinal survey," THEMA Working Papers 2015-19, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    9. Gil, J. & Sicras-Mainar, A. & Zucchelli, E., 2016. "The effects of non-adherence on health care utilisation: panel data evidence on uncontrolled diabetes," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/07, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    10. Zhang, Xiaohui & Zhao, Xueyan & Harris, Anthony, 2009. "Chronic diseases and labour force participation in Australia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 91-108, January.
    11. Bergemann, Annette & Grönqvist, Erik & Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia, 2011. "The effects of job displacement on the onset and progression of diabetes," Annual Conference 2011 (Frankfurt, Main): The Order of the World Economy - Lessons from the Crisis 48695, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    12. H. Shelton Brown & José A. Pagán & Elena Bastida, 2005. "The impact of diabetes on employment: genetic IVs in a bivariate probit," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(5), pages 537-544.
    13. Linda Dynan, 2009. "The Contribution of Economists to Understanding Racial Health Disparities in the US," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 213-223, September.
    14. Liu, Xiaoou & Zhu, Chen, 2014. "Will knowing diabetes affect labor income? Evidence from a natural experiment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 74-78.
    15. Veronesi, Marcella, 2007. "Environmental Risk Factors, Health and the Labor Market Response of Married Men and Women in the United States," Working Papers 98552, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    16. Lixin Cai & Changxin Cong, 2009. "Effects Of Health And Chronic Diseases On Labour Force Participation Of Older Working-Age Australians ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 166-182, June.

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