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The impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Seuring, Till
  • Goryakin, Yevgeniy
  • Suhrcke, Marc

Abstract

This study explores the impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico using data from the Mexican Family Life Survey (MxFLS) (2005), taking into account the possible endogeneity of diabetes via an instrumental variable estimation strategy. We find that diabetes significantly decreases employment probabilities for men by about 10 percentage points (p<0.01) and somewhat less so for women – 4.5 percentage points (p<0.1) – without any indication of diabetes being endogenous. Further analysis shows that diabetes mainly affects the employment probabilities of men and women above the age of 44 and also has stronger effects on the poor than on the rich, particularly for men. We also find some indication for more adverse effects of diabetes on those in the large informal labour market compared to those in formal employment. Our results highlight – for the first time – the detrimental employment impact of diabetes in a developing country.

Suggested Citation

  • Seuring, Till & Goryakin, Yevgeniy & Suhrcke, Marc, 2015. "The impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 85-100.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:18:y:2015:i:c:p:85-100
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2015.04.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Thesis Thursday: Till Seuring
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-07-20 11:00:57

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    Cited by:

    1. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Viinikainen, Jutta & Hakulinen, Christian & Pulkki-Råback, Laura & Raitakari, Olli & Pehkonen, Jaakko, 2017. "Biomarkers and long-term labour market outcomes: The case of creatine," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 259-274.
    2. Seuring, Till & Serneels, Pieter & Suhrcke, Marc, 2016. "The Impact of Diabetes on Labor Market Outcomes in Mexico: A Panel Data and Biomarker Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 10123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Till Seuring & Olga Archangelidi & Marc Suhrcke, 2015. "The Economic Costs of Type 2 Diabetes: A Global Systematic Review," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 33(8), pages 811-831, August.
    4. Persson, Sofie & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Steen Carlsson, Katarina, 2016. "Labor market consequences of childhood onset type 1 diabetes," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 180-192.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Diabetes; Employment; Instrumental variable; Mexico;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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