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The impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico

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  • Seuring, Till
  • Goryakin, Yevgeniy
  • Suhrcke, Marc

Abstract

This study explores the impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico using data from the Mexican Family Life Survey (MxFLS) (2005), taking into account the possible endogeneity of diabetes via an instrumental variable estimation strategy. We find that diabetes significantly decreases employment probabilities for men by about 10 percentage points (p<0.01) and somewhat less so for women – 4.5 percentage points (p<0.1) – without any indication of diabetes being endogenous. Further analysis shows that diabetes mainly affects the employment probabilities of men and women above the age of 44 and also has stronger effects on the poor than on the rich, particularly for men. We also find some indication for more adverse effects of diabetes on those in the large informal labour market compared to those in formal employment. Our results highlight – for the first time – the detrimental employment impact of diabetes in a developing country.

Suggested Citation

  • Seuring, Till & Goryakin, Yevgeniy & Suhrcke, Marc, 2015. "The impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 85-100.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:18:y:2015:i:c:p:85-100
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2015.04.002
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Thesis Thursday: Till Seuring
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-07-20 11:00:57

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    Cited by:

    1. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Viinikainen, Jutta & Hakulinen, Christian & Pulkki-Råback, Laura & Raitakari, Olli & Pehkonen, Jaakko, 2017. "Biomarkers and long-term labour market outcomes: The case of creatine," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 259-274.
    2. Seuring, Till & Serneels, Pieter & Suhrcke, Marc & Bachmann, Max, 2020. "Diabetes, employment and behavioural risk factors in China: Marginal structural models versus fixed effects models," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 39(C).
    3. Kumara, Ajantha Sisira & Samaratunge, Ramanie, 2018. "The effects of chronic non-communicable diseases on labour force outcomes: Quasi experimental evidence from Sri Lanka," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 40-53.
    4. Steven F. Koch & Evelyn Tshela, 2020. "The Impact of Diabetes on Labour Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2020109, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    5. Seuring, Till & Serneels, Pieter & Suhrcke, Marc, 2019. "The impact of diabetes on labour market outcomes in Mexico: A panel data and biomarker analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 233(C), pages 252-261.
    6. Gaggero, Alessio, 2020. "The effect of type 2 diabetes diagnosis in the elderly," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 37(C).
    7. Till Seuring & Olga Archangelidi & Marc Suhrcke, 2015. "The Economic Costs of Type 2 Diabetes: A Global Systematic Review," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 33(8), pages 811-831, August.
    8. Persson, Sofie & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Steen Carlsson, Katarina, 2016. "Labor market consequences of childhood onset type 1 diabetes," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 180-192.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Diabetes; Employment; Instrumental variable; Mexico;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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