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The Impact of Diabetes on Labor Market Outcomes in Mexico: A Panel Data and Biomarker Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Seuring, Till

    () (Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology (BIPS))

  • Serneels, Pieter

    () (University of East Anglia)

  • Suhrcke, Marc

    () (University of York)

Abstract

There is limited evidence on the labor market impact of diabetes, and existing evidence tends to be weakly identified. Making use of Mexican panel data to estimate individual fixed effects models, we find evidence for adverse effects of self-reported diabetes on employment probabilities, but not on wages or hours worked. Complementary biomarker information for a cross section indicates a large diabetes population unaware of the disease. When accounting for this, the negative relationship of self-reported diabetes with employment remains, but does not extend to those unaware. This difference cannot be explained by more severe diabetes among the self-reports, but rather worse general health.

Suggested Citation

  • Seuring, Till & Serneels, Pieter & Suhrcke, Marc, 2016. "The Impact of Diabetes on Labor Market Outcomes in Mexico: A Panel Data and Biomarker Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 10123, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10123
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Thesis Thursday: Till Seuring
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-07-20 11:00:57

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    Cited by:

    1. Gaggero, Alessio, 2020. "The effect of type 2 diabetes diagnosis in the elderly," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 37(C).
    2. Seuring, Till & Serneels, Pieter & Suhrcke, Marc & Bachmann, Max, 2020. "Diabetes, employment and behavioural risk factors in China: Marginal structural models versus fixed effects models," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 39(C).
    3. Steven F. Koch & Evelyn Tshela, 2020. "The Impact of Diabetes on Labour Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2020109, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    diabetes; labor market; Mexico; biomarker; panel data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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