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The Impact of Diabetes on Labor Market Outcomes in Mexico: A Panel Data and Biomarker Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Seuring, Till

    () (University of East Anglia)

  • Serneels, Pieter

    () (University of East Anglia)

  • Suhrcke, Marc

    () (University of York)

Abstract

There is limited evidence on the labor market impact of diabetes, and existing evidence tends to be weakly identified. Making use of Mexican panel data to estimate individual fixed effects models, we find evidence for adverse effects of self-reported diabetes on employment probabilities, but not on wages or hours worked. Complementary biomarker information for a cross section indicates a large diabetes population unaware of the disease. When accounting for this, the negative relationship of self-reported diabetes with employment remains, but does not extend to those unaware. This difference cannot be explained by more severe diabetes among the self-reports, but rather worse general health.

Suggested Citation

  • Seuring, Till & Serneels, Pieter & Suhrcke, Marc, 2016. "The Impact of Diabetes on Labor Market Outcomes in Mexico: A Panel Data and Biomarker Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 10123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10123
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Thesis Thursday: Till Seuring
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-07-20 11:00:57

    More about this item

    Keywords

    diabetes; labor market; Mexico; biomarker; panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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