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Health investment decisions in response to diabetes information in older Americans

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  • Slade, Alexander N.

Abstract

Diabetes is a very common and serious chronic disease, and one of the fastest growing disease burdens in the United States. Further, health behaviors, such as exercise, smoking, drinking, as well as weight status, are instrumental to diabetes management and the reduction of its medical consequences. Nine waves of the Health and Retirement Study are used to model the role of a recent diabetes diagnosis and medication on present and subsequent weight status, exercise, drinking and smoking activity. Several non-linear dynamic population average probit models are estimated. Results suggest that compared to non-diagnosed individuals at risk for high blood sugar, diagnosed diabetics respond initially in terms of increasing exercise, losing weight, and curbing smoking and drinking behavior, but the effect diminishes after diagnosis. Evidence of recidivism is also found in these outcomes, especially weight status and physical activity, suggesting that some behavioral responses to diabetes may be short-lived.

Suggested Citation

  • Slade, Alexander N., 2012. "Health investment decisions in response to diabetes information in older Americans," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 502-520.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:31:y:2012:i:3:p:502-520
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2012.04.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Till Seuring & Pieter Serneels & Marc Suhrcke, 2016. "The impact of diabetes on labour market outcomes in Mexico: a panel data and biomarker analysis," Working Papers 134cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    2. Lo, Te-Fen & Hsieh, Chee-Ruey, 2013. "Dynamic profile of health investment and the evolution of elderly health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 134-142.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Diabetes; Health behaviors; Older Americans; Chronic disease self-management;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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