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Does information on health status lead to a healthier lifestyle? Evidence from China on the effect of hypertension diagnosis on food consumption

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  • Zhao, Meng
  • Konishi, Yoshifumi
  • Glewwe, Paul

Abstract

We examine the role of information in understanding the differential effects of income on the demand for health. In the health capital framework of Grossman (JPE, 1972), we derive the testable hypotheses that individuals adjust their diet in a healthier direction upon receiving negative health information, and that the effect is greater for richer individuals. Based on unique Chinese longitudinal data and a regression discontinuity design that exploits the exogenous cutoff of systolic blood pressure in the diagnosis of hypertension, we find that, upon receiving hypertension diagnosis, individuals reduce fat intake significantly, and richer individuals reduce more. Our results also indicate that among the rich, hypertension diagnosis is more effective for individuals with lower education.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhao, Meng & Konishi, Yoshifumi & Glewwe, Paul, 2013. "Does information on health status lead to a healthier lifestyle? Evidence from China on the effect of hypertension diagnosis on food consumption," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 367-385.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:32:y:2013:i:2:p:367-385
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2012.11.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lant Pritchett & Lawrence H. Summers, 1996. "Wealthier is Healthier," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 841-868.
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    9. Grossman, Michael, 2006. "Education and Nonmarket Outcomes," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    10. Van de Poel, Ellen & O'Donnell, Owen & Van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2009. "Urbanization and the spread of diseases of affluence in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 200-216, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jing You, 2014. "Dietary change, nutrient transition and food security in fast-growing China," Chapters,in: Handbook on Food, chapter 9, pages 204-245 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. You, Jing & Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav, 2016. "Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 171-191.
    3. Kim, Hyuncheol Bryant & Lee, Suejin & Lim, Wilfredo, 2017. "Knowing Is Not Half the Battle: Impacts of the National Health Screening Program in Korea," IZA Discussion Papers 10650, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. repec:taf:mpopst:v:23:y:2016:i:4:p:239-252 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Heshmati, Almas, 2016. "The Economics of Healthy Ageing in China," IZA Discussion Papers 9713, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Dahlberg, Matz & Mani, Kevin & Öhman, Mattias & Wanhainen, Anders, 2016. "Health Information and Well-Being: Evidence from an Asymptomatic Disease," Working Paper Series 2016:2, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. repec:eee:socmed:v:217:y:2018:i:c:p:18-30 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Till Seuring & Pieter Serneels & Marc Suhrcke, 2016. "The impact of diabetes on labour market outcomes in Mexico: a panel data and biomarker analysis," Working Papers 134cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    9. repec:kap:jecinq:v:16:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10888-017-9352-z is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health information; Hypertension; Diet; Regression discontinuity; China;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices

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