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Urbanization and the spread of diseases of affluence in China

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  • Van de Poel, E
  • O'Donnell, O
  • van Doorslaer, E

Abstract

A new methodology is used to quantify, track and explain the distribution of obesity and hypertension across areas differentiated by their degree of urbanicity. We construct an index of urbanicity from longitudinal data on community characteristics from the China Health and Nutrition Survey and compute a rank-based measure of inequality in disease risk factors by degree of urbanicity. Prevalence rates almost doubled over the period 1991-2004 and the risk factors became less concentrated in more urbanized areas. Decomposition analysis shows that urbanicity-related inequalities are mostly attributable to differences in community level characteristics and to disparities in incomes and in the physical and farming activity of individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Van de Poel, E & O'Donnell, O & van Doorslaer, E, 2008. "Urbanization and the spread of diseases of affluence in China," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/25, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:08/25
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    Cited by:

    1. Tafreschi, Darjusch, 2015. "The income body weight gradients in the developing economy of China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 115-134.
    2. Mary Schooling, C. & Lau, Elaine W.L. & Tin, Keith Y.K. & Leung, Gabriel M., 2010. "Social disparities and cause-specific mortality during economic development," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(10), pages 1550-1557, May.
    3. repec:spr:hecrev:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s13561-017-0164-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Zhou, Song & Awokuse, Titus O., "undated". "Urbanization, Nutrition Transition, and Obesity: Evidence from China," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170458, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Guojun He & Jeffrey M. Perloff, 2016. "Surface Water Quality and Infant Mortality in China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(1), pages 119-139.
    6. Liu, Hong & Fang, Hai & Zhao, Zhong, 2013. "Urban–rural disparities of child health and nutritional status in China from 1989 to 2006," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 294-309.
    7. E. Van de Poel & O. O'Donnell & E. Van Doorslaer, 2009. "The Health Penalty of China's Rapid Urbanization," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-016/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. Heckley, Gawain & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Kjellsson, Gustav, 2016. "A general method for decomposing the causes of socioeconomic inequality in health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 89-106.
    9. Zhao, Meng & Konishi, Yoshifumi & Glewwe, Paul, 2013. "Does information on health status lead to a healthier lifestyle? Evidence from China on the effect of hypertension diagnosis on food consumption," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 367-385.
    10. Dolton, Peter & Xiao, Mimi, 2015. "The intergenerational transmission of BMI in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 90-113.
    11. Jones-Smith, Jessica C. & Popkin, Barry M., 2010. "Understanding community context and adult health changes in China: Development of an urbanicity scale," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(8), pages 1436-1446, October.

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    Keywords

    China; urbanization; health inequalities; obesity; hypertension; decomposition;

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