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Urbanization And Health Care In Rural China

Author

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  • Gordon G. Liu
  • Xiaodong Wu
  • Chaoyang Peng
  • Alex Z. Fu

Abstract

Strong economic growth has led to remarkable urbanization in China. Using the China Health and Nutrition Survey, this study provides the first empirical evidence documenting the impact of urbanization on rural health care and insurance. The primary finding is that urbanization leads to a significant and equitable increase in insurance coverage, which in turn plays a critical role in access to care. In addition, adverse selection exists in the demand for insurance. Income is also a significant determinant of insurance coverage. This study concludes that urbanization can help make substantial changes in rural health care and insurance status. Copyright 2003 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Gordon G. Liu & Xiaodong Wu & Chaoyang Peng & Alex Z. Fu, 2003. "Urbanization And Health Care In Rural China," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(1), pages 11-24, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:21:y:2003:i:1:p:11-24
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Van de Poel, Ellen & O'Donnell, Owen & Van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2009. "Urbanization and the spread of diseases of affluence in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 200-216, July.
    2. Wagstaff, Adam & Lindelow, Magnus, 2008. "Can insurance increase financial risk?: The curious case of health insurance in China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 990-1005, July.
    3. Rong Hu & Chunli Shen & Heng-fu Zou, 2011. "Health Care System Reform in China: Issues, Challenges and Options," CEMA Working Papers 517, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    4. Carine Milcent & Feng Jin, 2010. "Decrease in the healthcare demand in rural China: A side effect of the industrialization process?," Working Papers halshs-00564848, HAL.
    5. Liu, Hong & Gao, Song & Rizzo, John A., 2011. "The expansion of public health insurance and the demand for private health insurance in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 28-41, March.
    6. Carine Milcent, 2013. "Industrialisation et Inégalités : Le recours aux soins en zones rurales chinoises," Working Papers halshs-00826889, HAL.
    7. John Gibson & Xiangzheng Deng & Geua Boe-Gibson & Scott Rozelle & Jikun Huang, 2008. "Which Households Are Most Distant from Health Centers in Rural China? Evidence from a GIS Network Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 08/19, University of Waikato.
    8. Wang, H. Holly & Rosenman, Robert, 2007. "Perceived need and actual demand for health insurance among rural Chinese residents," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 373-388.
    9. Du, Juan, 2009. "Economic reforms and health insurance in China," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 387-395, August.
    10. Carine Milcent, 2011. "Baisse du recours aux soins dans les zones rurales en Chine," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-00653450, HAL.
    11. Carine Milcent, 2013. "Industrialisation et Inégalités : Le recours aux soins en zones rurales chinoises," PSE Working Papers halshs-00826889, HAL.
    12. Carine Milcent, 2011. "Baisse du recours aux soins dans les zones rurales en Chine," Working Papers halshs-00653450, HAL.
    13. Rong Hu & Chunli Shen & Heng-fu Zou, 2013. "Health Care System Reform in China: Issues, Challenges and Options," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 279-298, May.

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