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Sleep behavior and unemployment conditions

Author

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  • Antillón, Marina
  • Lauderdale, Diane S.
  • Mullahy, John

Abstract

Recent research has reported that habitually short sleep duration is a risk factor for declining health, including increased risk of obesity, diabetes and coronary heart disease. In this study we investigate whether macroeconomic conditions are associated with variation in mean sleep time in the United States, and if so, whether the effect is procyclical or countercyclical. We merge state unemployment rates from 2003 through 2012 with the American Time Use Survey, a nationally representative sample of adults with 24h time diaries. We find that higher aggregate unemployment is associated with longer mean sleep duration, with each additional point of state unemployment associated with an additional average 0.83min of sleep (p<0.001), after adjusting for a secular trend of increasing sleep over the time period. Despite a national poll in 2009 that found one-third of Americans reporting losing sleep over the economy, we do not find that higher state unemployment is associated with more sleeplessness. Instead, we find that higher state unemployment is associated with less frequent time use described as “sleeplessness” (marginal effect=0.05 at 4% unemployment and 0.034 at 14% unemployment, p<0.001), after controlling for a secular trend.

Suggested Citation

  • Antillón, Marina & Lauderdale, Diane S. & Mullahy, John, 2014. "Sleep behavior and unemployment conditions," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 22-32.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:14:y:2014:i:c:p:22-32 DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2014.03.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. A little problem with the jobs recovery
      by ? in Free Exchange on 2014-08-13 23:14:26

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1437-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:25 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Costa-Font, Joan & Flèche, Sarah, 2017. "Parental sleep and employment: evidence from a British cohort study," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 69530, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Seuring, Till & Goryakin, Yevgeniy & Suhrcke, Marc, 2015. "The impact of diabetes on employment in Mexico," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 85-100.
    5. Sedigh, Golnaz & Devlin, Rose Anne & Grenier, Gilles & Deri Armstrong, Catherine, 2017. "Revisiting the relationship between wages and sleep duration: The role of insomnia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 125-139.
    6. Alan T. Piper, 2016. "Sleep duration and life satisfaction," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 63(4), pages 305-325, December.
    7. Ásgeirsdóttir, Tinna Laufey & Corman, Hope & Noonan, Kelly & Reichman, Nancy E., 2016. "Lifecycle effects of a recession on health behaviors: Boom, bust, and recovery in Iceland," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 90-107.
    8. Christian Pfeifer, 2015. "Unfair Wage Perceptions and Sleep: Evidence from German Survey Data," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 789, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Bishop, James, 2015. "No Rest for the Weary: Commuting, Hours Worked, and Sleep," MPRA Paper 62162, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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