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Labor Market Consequences of State Mental Health Parity Mandates

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  • Cseh Attila

    () (Valdosta State University)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effects of state mental health parity mandates on the labor and insurance markets. In particular, I investigate the effect of parity regulations along five margins: having employer provided health insurance coverage, employer contributions to health insurance premiums, the probability of full-time employment, working hours, and wages for a sample of private workers in firms with less than 100 employees using the Annual Demographic Surveys (March CPS) for the years 1999-2004 (and also in an extended sample of CPS 1992-2004). It is hypothesized that if parity mandates are costly they will have an impact on at least one of the above margins. I find no evidence for any of the most feared impact: a reduction in the probability of having employer-provided health insurance coverage or that state mental health parity mandates have decreased the generosity of employers' contributions to health insurance premiums. The results also lack any evidence of an impact on labor market composition or of costs having been passed onto workers in terms of lower wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Cseh Attila, 2008. "Labor Market Consequences of State Mental Health Parity Mandates," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(2), pages 1-34, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:fhecpo:v:11:y:2008:i:2:n:5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jonathan Klick & Sara Markowitz, 2006. "Are mental health insurance mandates effective? Evidence from suicides," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 83-97.
    2. Katherine Baicker & Amitabh Chandra, 2006. "The Labor Market Effects of Rising Health Insurance Premiums," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 609-634, July.
    3. Jonathan Klick & Thomas Stratmann, 2006. "Subsidizing Addiction: Do State Health Insurance Mandates Increase Alcohol Consumption?," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 175-198, January.
    4. Gruber, Jonathan & McKnight, Robin, 2003. "Why did employee health insurance contributions rise?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 1085-1104, November.
    5. Judith Shinogle & David Salkever, 2005. "Firms' Demand for Employment-Based Mental Health Benefits," NBER Working Papers 11436, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gruber, Jonathan, 1994. "State-mandated benefits and employer-provided health insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 433-464, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:jhecon:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:45-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Andersen, Martin, 2015. "Heterogeneity and the effect of mental health parity mandates on the labor market," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 74-84.
    3. Joanna N. Lahey, 2012. "The efficiency of a groupā€specific mandated benefit revisited: The effect of infertility mandates," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(1), pages 63-92, December.
    4. Atsuko Tanaka & Laurel Beck, "undated". "Mental Well-being of the Bereaved and Labor Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2015-24, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 19 Nov 2015.

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