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Who Pays the High Health Costs of Older Workers? Evidence from Prostate Cancer Screening Mandates

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  • James Bailey

    () (Department of Economics, Temple University)

Abstract

Between 1992 and 2009, 30 US states adopted laws mandating that health insurance plans cover screenings for prostate cancer. Because prostate cancer screenings are used almost exclusively by men over age 50, these mandates raise the cost of insuring older men relative to other groups. This paper uses a triple-difference empirical strategy to take advantage of this quasi-random natural experiment in raising the cost of employing older workers. Using IPUMS data from the March Supplement of the Current Population Survey, this paper finds that the increased cost of insuring older workers results in their receiving 2.8% lower hourly wages, being 2% less likely to be employed, and being 0.7% less likely to have employer-sponsored health insurance.

Suggested Citation

  • James Bailey, 2013. "Who Pays the High Health Costs of Older Workers? Evidence from Prostate Cancer Screening Mandates," DETU Working Papers 1302, Department of Economics, Temple University.
  • Handle: RePEc:tem:wpaper:1302
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    File URL: http://www.cla.temple.edu/RePEc/documents/DETU_13_02.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David N van der Goes & Justin Wang & Katharine C Wolchik, 2011. "Effect of State Health Insurance Mandates on Employer-provided Health Insurance," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 437-449.
    2. Bound, John & Schoenbaum, Michael & Stinebrickner, Todd R. & Waidmann, Timothy, 1999. "The dynamic effects of health on the labor force transitions of older workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 179-202, June.
    3. Thomas C. Buchmueller & John DiNardo & Robert G. Valletta, 2011. "The Effect of an Employer Health Insurance Mandate on Health Insurance Coverage and the Demand for Labor: Evidence from Hawaii," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 25-51, November.
    4. Depew, Briggs & Bailey, James, 2015. "Did the Affordable Care Act's dependent coverage mandate increase premiums?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-14.
    5. Frank A. Scott & Mark C. Berger & John E. Garen, 1995. "Do Health Insurance and Pension Costs Reduce the Job Opportunities of Older Workers?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(4), pages 775-791, July.
    6. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    7. Stephan F. Gohmann, 2009. "The Effect of State Mandates on Health Insurance Premiums," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 24(Spring 20), pages 59-73.
    8. James Bailey, 2013. "The Effect of Health Insurance Benefit Mandates on Premiums," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 119-127, December.
    9. Kowalski Amanda E. & Congdon William J. & Showalter Mark H., 2008. "State Health Insurance Regulations and the Price of High-Deductible Policies," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(2), pages 1-26, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bailey, James, 2013. "Who pays for obesity? Evidence from health insurance benefit mandates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 287-289.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Older Workers; Prostate Cancer Screening; Health Insurance; Mandated Benefits; Triple-Difference;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private

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