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Exploring the intergenerational persistence of mental health: Evidence from three generations

  • Johnston, David W.
  • Schurer, Stefanie
  • Shields, Michael A.

This paper uses data from the 1970 British Cohort Study to quantify the intergenerational persistence of mental health, and the long-run economic costs associated with poor parental mental health. We find a strong and significant intergenerational correlation that is robust to different covariate sets, sample restrictions, model specifications and potential endogeneity. Importantly, the intergenerational persistence is economically relevant, with maternal mental health associated with lasting effects on the child's educational attainment, future household income and the probability of having criminal convictions. These results do not disappear after controlling for children's own childhood and adulthood mental health.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2013)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 1077-1089

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:32:y:2013:i:6:p:1077-1089
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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