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Does managed health care reduce health care disparities between minorities and Whites?


  • Balsa, Ana I.
  • Cao, Zhun
  • McGuire, Thomas G.


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  • Balsa, Ana I. & Cao, Zhun & McGuire, Thomas G., 2007. "Does managed health care reduce health care disparities between minorities and Whites?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 101-121, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:26:y:2007:i:1:p:101-121

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Newey, Whitney K., 1987. "Efficient estimation of limited dependent variable models with endogenous explanatory variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 231-250, November.
    2. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, July.
    3. Goldman D. P. & Bhattacharya J. & McCaffrey D. F. & Duan N. & Leibowitz A. A. & Joyce G. F. & Morton S. C., 2001. "Effect of Insurance on Mortality in an HIV-Positive Population in Care," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 96, pages 883-894, September.
    4. Currie, Janet & Fahr, John, 2005. "Medicaid managed care: effects on children's Medicaid coverage and utilization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 85-108, January.
    5. Michelle M. Mello & Sally C. Stearns & Edward C. Norton, 2002. "Do Medicare HMOs still reduce health services use after controlling for selection bias?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(4), pages 323-340.
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    Cited by:

    1. Duggan, Mark & Starc, Amanda & Vabson, Boris, 2016. "Who benefits when the government pays more? Pass-through in the Medicare Advantage program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 50-67.
    2. Nicholas Lauren Hersch, 2013. "Better Quality of Care or Healthier Patients? Hospital Utilization by Medicare Advantage and Fee-for-Service Enrollees," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-25, May.
    3. David Frisvold & Ezra Golberstein, 2013. "The Effect of School Quality on Black-White Health Differences: Evidence From Segregated Southern Schools," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(6), pages 1989-2012, December.
    4. Glazer, Jacob & McGuire, Thomas G., 2013. "Making Medicare advantage a middle-class program," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 463-473.
    5. David, Guy & Harrington, Scott E., 2010. "Population density and racial differences in the performance of emergency medical services," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 603-615, July.
    6. Linda Dynan, 2009. "The Contribution of Economists to Understanding Racial Health Disparities in the US," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(3), pages 213-223, September.

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