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Is There Really a Green Paradox?

Citations

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Cited by:

  1. Mare Sarr & Joëlle Noailly, 2017. "Innovation, Diffusion, Growth and the Environment: Taking Stock and Charting New Directions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 66(3), pages 393-407, March.
  2. Winter, Ralph A., 2014. "Innovation and the dynamics of global warming," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 124-140.
  3. van der Meijden, Gerard & van der Ploeg, Frederick & Withagen, Cees, 2015. "International capital markets, oil producers and the Green Paradox," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 275-297.
  4. David, Paul & Van Zon, Adriaan, 2012. "Optimal multi-phase transition paths toward a stabilized global climate: Integrated dynamic requirements analysis for the 'tech fix'," MERIT Working Papers 075, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  5. Jussila Hammes, Johanna, 2011. "Path dependence: Biofuels policy under uncertainty about greenhouse gas emissions," Working papers in Transport Economics 2011:1, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
  6. Hoel, Michael & Jensen, Svenn, 2012. "Cutting costs of catching carbon—Intertemporal effects under imperfect climate policy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 680-695.
  7. Frederick van der Ploeg & Cees Withagen, 2010. "Growth and the Optimal Carbon Tax: When to switch from exhaustible resources to renewables?," OxCarre Working Papers 055, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  8. Açıkgöz, Ömer T. & Benchekroun, Hassan, 2017. "Anticipated international environmental agreements," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 306-336.
  9. Frederick van der Ploeg, 2012. "Breakthrough Renewables and the Green Paradox," OxCarre Working Papers 091, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  10. Frederick Ploeg, 2015. "Untapped fossil fuel and the green paradox: a classroom calibration of the optimal carbon tax," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(2), pages 185-210, April.
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