IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Global Warming and the Green Paradox: A review of adverse effects of climate policies

Listed author(s):
  • Frederick van der Ploeg
  • Cees Withagen

This article examines the possible adverse effects of well-intended climate policies. A weak Green Paradox arises if the announcement of a future carbon tax or a sufficiently fast rising carbon tax encourages fossil fuel owners to extract reserves more aggressively, thus exacerbating global warming. We argue that such policies may also encourage more fossil fuel to be locked in the crust of the earth, which can offset the adverse effects of the weak Green Paradox. We show that a subsidy on clean renewables has similar weak Green Paradox effects. Green welfare (the complement of environmental damages) drops (i.e., the strong Green Paradox) if the beneficial climate effects of locking up more fossil fuel do not outweigh the short-run weak Green Paradox effects. Neither the weak nor the strong Green Paradox occurs for the first-best Pigouvian carbon tax. We also pay attention to dirty backstops, spatial carbon leakage and green innovation.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.oxcarre.ox.ac.uk/images/stories/papers/ResearchPapers/oxcarrerp2013116.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford in its series OxCarre Working Papers with number 116.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2013
Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:116
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Manor Road, Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Web page: http://www.oxcarre.ox.ac.uk/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window

  1. Reyer Gerlagh, 2010. "Too Much Oil," Working Papers 2010.14, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  2. Frederick Van der Ploeg & Cees A. Withagen, 2010. "Is There Really a Green Paradox?," CESifo Working Paper Series 2963, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Frederick van der Ploeg & Cees Withagen, 2011. "Too Much Coal, Too Little Oil," OxCarre Working Papers 056, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Snorre Kverndokk, 1994. "Depletion of Fossil Fuels and the impact of Global Warming," Discussion Papers 107, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  5. Jon Strand, 2007. "Technology Treaties and Fossil-Fuels Extraction," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 129-142.
  6. Sjak Smulders & Yacov Tsur & Amos Zemel, 2010. "Announcing Climate Policy: Can a Green Paradox Arise without Scarcity?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3307, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Gerlagh, Reyer & Liski, Matti, 2011. "Strategic resource dependence," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(2), pages 699-727, March.
  8. John Hassler & Per Krusell & Conny Olovsson, 2010. "Oil Monopoly and the Climate," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 460-464, May.
  9. Withagen, Cees, 1994. "Pollution and exhaustibility of fossil fuels," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 235-242, August.
  10. Hendrik Ritter & Mark Schopf, 2013. "Unilateral Climate Policy: Harmful or even Disastrous?," FEMM Working Papers 130010, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
  11. Frederick Ploeg & Cees Withagen, 1991. "Pollution control and the Ramsey problem," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 1(2), pages 215-236, June.
  12. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2007. "Public Policies against Global Warming," CESifo Working Paper Series 2087, CESifo Group Munich.
  13. Liski, Matti & Tahvonen, Olli, 2004. "Can carbon tax eat OPEC's rents?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 1-12, January.
  14. Olli Tahvonen, 1997. "Fossil Fuels, Stock Externalities, and Backstop Technology," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 855-874, November.
  15. Daubanes, Julien & Grimaud, André & Rougé, Luc, 2012. "Green Paradox and Directed Technical Change: The Effects of Subsidies to Clean R&D," TSE Working Papers 12-337, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
  16. Hoel, Michael, 1983. "Monopoly resource extractions under the presence of predetermined substitute production," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 201-212, June.
  17. Sinn, Hans-Werner, . "Das grüne Paradoxon ; Plädoyer für eine illusionsfreie Klimapolitik," Monographs in Economics, University of Munich, Department of Economics, number 19627, December.
  18. Corrado Di Maria & Ian A. Lange & Edwin van der Werf, 2013. "Going Full Circle: Demand-Side Constraints to the Green Paradox," CESifo Working Paper Series 4152, CESifo Group Munich.
  19. Armon Rezai & Frederick van der Ploeg & Cees Withagen, 2012. "The Optimal Carbon Tax and Economic Growth: Additive versus Multiplicative Damages," CEEES Paper Series CE3S-05/12, European University at St. Petersburg, Department of Economics.
  20. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2009. "Carbon Leakage, the Green Paradox and Perfect Future Markets," CESifo Working Paper Series 2542, CESifo Group Munich.
  21. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1981. "The theory of exhaustible resources," Munich Reprints in Economics 19910, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  22. CHAKRAVORTY Ujjayant & MOREAUX Michel & TIDBALL Mabel, 2006. "Ordering the Extraction of Polluting Nonrenewable Resources," LERNA Working Papers 06.19.212, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
  23. Hoel, Michael, 1978. "Resource extraction, substitute production, and monopoly," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 28-37, October.
  24. Di Maria, Corrado & Smulders, Sjak & van der Werf, Edwin, 2012. "Absolute abundance and relative scarcity: Environmental policy with implementation lags," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 104-119.
  25. Niko Jaakkola, 2013. "Putting OPEC Out of Business," OxCarre Working Papers 099, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  26. Stephen W. Salant, 1977. "Staving off the backstop: dynamic limit-pricing with a kinked demand curve," International Finance Discussion Papers 110, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:116. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Celia Kingham)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.