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Unilateral Climate Policy: Harmful or even Disastrous?

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  • Hendrik Ritter

    () (Faculty of Economics and Management, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg)

  • Mark Schopf

    () (Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, University of Paderborn)

Abstract

This paper deals with possible foreign reactions to unilateral carbon demand reducing policies. It differentiates between demand side and supply side reactions as well as between intra- and intertemporal shifts in greenhouse gas emissions. In our model, we integrate a stock-dependent marginal physical cost of extracting fossil fuels into Eichner & Pethig's (2011) general equilibrium carbon leakage model. The results are as follows: Under similar but somewhat tighter conditions than those derived by Eichner & Pethig (2011), a weak green paradox arises. Furthermore, a strong green paradox can arise in our model under supplementary constraints. That means a "green" policy measure might not only lead to a harmful acceleration of fossil fuel extraction but to an increase in the cumulative climate damages at the same time. In some of these cases there is even a cumulative extraction expansion, which we consider disastrous.

Suggested Citation

  • Hendrik Ritter & Mark Schopf, 2013. "Unilateral Climate Policy: Harmful or even Disastrous?," FEMM Working Papers 130010, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:mag:wpaper:130010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hoel, Michael & Jensen, Svenn, 2012. "Cutting costs of catching carbon—Intertemporal effects under imperfect climate policy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 680-695.
    2. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2011. "Carbon Leakage, The Green Paradox, And Perfect Future Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(3), pages 767-805, August.
    3. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Ru¨diger, 2013. "Flattening the carbon extraction path in unilateral cost-effective action," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 185-201.
    4. Reyer Gerlagh, 2011. "Too Much Oil," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(1), pages 79-102, March.
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    6. Corrado Maria & Edwin Werf, 2008. "Carbon leakage revisited: unilateral climate policy with directed technical change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 39(2), pages 55-74, February.
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    8. Hoel, Michael, 2013. "Supply Side Climate Policy and the Green Paradox," Memorandum 03/2013, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    9. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2008. "Public policies against global warming: a supply side approach," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 15(4), pages 360-394, August.
    10. van der Ploeg, Frederick & Withagen, Cees, 2012. "Is there really a green paradox?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 342-363.
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    1. repec:ces:ifobei:77 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. van der Meijden, Gerard & van der Ploeg, Frederick & Withagen, Cees, 2015. "International capital markets, oil producers and the Green Paradox," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 275-297.
    3. Cathrine Hagem & Halvor Briseid Storrøsten, 2016. "Supply versus demand-side policies in the presence of carbon leakage and the green paradox," Discussion Papers 836, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. Olga Kiuila & Krzysztof Wójtowicz & Tomasz Żylicz & Leszek Kasek, 2016. "Economic and environmental effects of unilateral climate actions," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 263-278, February.
    5. van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2016. "Second-best carbon taxation in the global economy: The Green Paradox and carbon leakage revisited," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 85-105.
    6. Christian Beermann, 2015. "Climate Policy and the Intertemporal Supply of Fossil Resources," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 62, January.
    7. Heindl, Peter & Kanschik, Philipp, 2016. "Ecological sufficiency, individual liberties, and distributive justice: Implications for policy making," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 42-50.
    8. Nachtigall, Daniel & Rübbelke, Dirk, 2016. "The green paradox and learning-by-doing in the renewable energy sector," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 74-92.
    9. Julien Xavier Daubanes & Fanny Henriet & Katheline Schubert, 2017. "More Gas, Less Coal, and Less CO2? Unilateral CO2 Reduction Policy with More than One Carbon Energy Source," CESifo Working Paper Series 6697, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Kollenbach, Gilbert, 2017. "Unilateral climate Policy and the Green Paradox: Extraction Costs matter," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168245, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. Mark Schopf, 2016. "Unilateral Supply Side Policies and the Green Paradox," Working Papers Dissertations 28, Paderborn University, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics.
    12. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2015. "Unilateral Climate Policy with Production-Based and Consumption-Based Carbon Emission Taxes," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 61(2), pages 141-163, June.
    13. Frederick van der Ploeg & Cees Withagen, 2015. "Global Warming and the Green Paradox: A Review of Adverse Effects of Climate Policies," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 285-303.
    14. Frederick van der Ploeg, 2015. "Unilateral Carbon Taxation in the Global Economy: The Green Paradox and carbon leakage revisted," OxCarre Working Papers 157, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    15. Mark Schopf, 2013. "Preserving Eastern or Offshore Oil for Preventing Green Paradoxes?," Working Papers CIE 63, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    16. Zhang, Kun & Zhang, Zong-Yong & Liang, Qiao-Mei, 2017. "An empirical analysis of the green paradox in China: From the perspective of fiscal decentralization," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 203-211.
    17. Partha Sen, 2016. "Unilateral Emission Cuts and Carbon Leakages in a Dynamic North–South Trade Model," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 64(1), pages 131-152, May.
    18. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Rüdiger, 2015. "Unilateral consumption-based carbon taxes and negative leakage," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 127-142.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural Resources; Carbon Leakage; Green Paradox;

    JEL classification:

    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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