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High Does Nothing and Rising Is Worse: Carbon Taxes Should Keep Declining to Cut Harmful Emissions

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  • Sinclair, Peter J N

Abstract

It is often that greenhouse gas emissions should be curbed by taxes on activities that generate them. This paper continues the case for taxes on fossil fuels in the context of an infinite-horizon growth model. Under simple conditions, a constant tax rate on energy use is found to exert no real effect: energy taxes just squeeze rents and have no impact on the time-profile of extraction. Expectations of falling energy taxes are what is needed to reduce extraction rates and postpone such adverse consequences that carbon emissions induce. Copyright 1992 by Blackwell Publishers Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester

Suggested Citation

  • Sinclair, Peter J N, 1992. "High Does Nothing and Rising Is Worse: Carbon Taxes Should Keep Declining to Cut Harmful Emissions," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 60(1), pages 41-52, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manch2:v:60:y:1992:i:1:p:41-52
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    Cited by:

    1. Soete, Luc & Ziesemer, Thomas, 1997. "Gains from trade and environmental policy under imperfect competition and pollution from transport," Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Rubio, Santiago J. & Escriche, Luisa, 2001. "Strategic pigouvian taxation, stock externalities and polluting non-renewable resources," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 297-313, February.
    3. Julien Daubanes, 2008. "Fossil fuels supplied by oligopolies: On optimal taxation and rent capture," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 17(13), pages 1-11.
    4. DAUBANES Julien & GRIMAUD André, 2006. "On the North-South Effects of Environmental Policy: Rent Transfers, Relocation and Growth," LERNA Working Papers 06.26.219, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    5. Grimaud, André & Rouge, Luc, 2014. "Carbon sequestration, economic policies and growth," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 307-331.
    6. R. Quentin Grafton & Tom Kompas & Ngo Van Long, 2010. "Biofuels Subsidies and the Green Paradox," CESifo Working Paper Series 2960, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Sandal, Leif K. & Steinshamn, Stein Ivar & Grafton, R. Quentin, 2003. ""More is less": the tax effects of ignoring flow externalities," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 239-254, August.
    8. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:17:y:2008:i:13:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Daubanes, Julien, 2009. "Taxation of Oil Products and GDP Dynamics of Oil-Rich Countries," TSE Working Papers 09-012, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    10. Jon Strand, 2008. "Importer and Producer Petroleum Taxation; A Geo-Political Model," IMF Working Papers 08/35, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Reyer Gerlagh, 2011. "Too Much Oil," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(1), pages 79-102, March.
    12. DAUBANES Julien, 2009. "Changement climatique, instruments économiques et propositions pour un accord post-Kyoto : une synthèse," LERNA Working Papers 09.19.295, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    13. Michael Hoel, 2010. "Climate Change and Carbon Tax Expectations," CESifo Working Paper Series 2966, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. Christian Groth & Poul Schou, 2004. "Capital Taxation, Growth, and Non-renewable Resources," EPRU Working Paper Series 04-16, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    15. Don Fullerton & Andrew Leicester & Stephen Smith, 2008. "Environmental Taxes," NBER Working Papers 14197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Groth, Christian & Schou, Poul, 2007. "Growth and non-renewable resources: The different roles of capital and resource taxes," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 80-98, January.
    17. Wie, Jiegen & Wennlock, Magnus & Johansson, Daniel J.A. & Sterner, Thomas, 2011. "The Fossil Endgame: Strategic Oil Price Discrimination and Carbon Taxation," Discussion Papers dp-11-26, Resources For the Future.

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