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Imperfect Environmental Policy and Polluting Emissions: The Green Paradox and Beyond

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  • van der Werf, Edwin
  • Di Maria, Corrado

Abstract

Well-intended policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions may have unintended undesirable consequences. Recently, a large literature has emerged showing that such a 'green paradox' may occur in response to particular policies. We review this literature and identify four different imperfect policy approaches that may induce a green paradox. We discuss under what conditions a green paradox may occur and highlight avenues for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • van der Werf, Edwin & Di Maria, Corrado, 2012. "Imperfect Environmental Policy and Polluting Emissions: The Green Paradox and Beyond," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 6(2), pages 153-194, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:now:jirere:101.00000050
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000050
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    Cited by:

    1. Smulders, Sjak & Tsur, Yacov & Zemel, Amos, 2012. "Announcing climate policy: Can a green paradox arise without scarcity?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 364-376.
    2. Di Maria, Corrado & Lange, Ian & van der Werf, Edwin, 2014. "Should we be worried about the green paradox? Announcement effects of the Acid Rain Program," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 143-162.
    3. Açıkgöz, Ömer T. & Benchekroun, Hassan, 2017. "Anticipated international environmental agreements," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 306-336.
    4. Zhang, Kun & Wang, Qian & Liang, Qiao-Mei & Chen, Hao, 2016. "A bibliometric analysis of research on carbon tax from 1989 to 2014," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 297-310.
    5. Hendrik Ritter & Mark Schopf, 2014. "Unilateral Climate Policy: Harmful or Even Disastrous?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 58(1), pages 155-178, May.
    6. Frederick van der Ploeg, 2013. "Cumulative Carbon Emissions and the Green Paradox," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 5(1), pages 281-300, June.
    7. Eliasson, Jonas & Proost, Stef, 2015. "Is sustainable transport policy sustainable?," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 92-100.
    8. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Ru¨diger, 2013. "Flattening the carbon extraction path in unilateral cost-effective action," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 185-201.
    9. Hans Gersbach & Marie-Catherine Riekhof, 2017. "Technology Treaties and Climate Change," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 17/268, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    10. Hochman, Gal & Zilberman, David, 2015. "The political economy of OPEC," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 203-216.
    11. van den Bijgaart, Inge, 2017. "The unilateral implementation of a sustainable growth path with directed technical change," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 305-327.
    12. Jus Darko & Meier Volker, 2015. "Announcing is Bad, Delaying is Worse: Another Pitfall in Well-intended Climate Policy," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(3), pages 286-297, June.
    13. Julia Blasch & Nina Boogen & Nilkanth Kumar & Massimo Filippini, 2017. "The role of energy and investment literacy for residential electricity demand and end-use efficiency," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 17/269, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    14. Thomas Michielsen, 2013. "Brown Backstops Versus the Green Paradox," OxCarre Working Papers 108, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    15. Rick van der Ploeg, 2017. "Race to Burn the Last Ton of Carbon and the Risk of Stranded Assets," CESifo Working Paper Series 6793, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. repec:eee:ecolec:v:138:y:2017:i:c:p:199-222 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. van den Bijgaart, Inge, 2016. "Essays in environmental economics and policy," Other publications TiSEM 298bee2a-cb08-4173-9fe1-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    18. repec:eee:jeeman:v:84:y:2017:i:c:p:102-124 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Zhang, Kun & Zhang, Zong-Yong & Liang, Qiao-Mei, 2017. "An empirical analysis of the green paradox in China: From the perspective of fiscal decentralization," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 203-211.
    20. repec:wsi:ccexxx:v:08:y:2017:i:02:n:s2010007817500075 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate policy; Green paradox; Nonrenewable resources; Scarcity; Carbon tax; Announcement effects; Implementation lag; Carbon leakage; Backstop technology;

    JEL classification:

    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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