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Christopher Spencer

Personal Details

First Name:Christopher
Middle Name:
Last Name:Spencer
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psp43
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/ec/Ourstaff/ChristopherSpencer.html

Affiliation

School of Business and Economics
Loughborough University

Loughborough, United Kingdom
http://info.lboro.ac.uk/departments/sbe/

: +44 (0) 1509 222701
+44 (0) 1509 223910
Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU
RePEc:edi:delbouk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Brown, Sarah & Gray, Daniel & Harris, Mark N. & Spencer, Christopher, 2016. "Portfolio Allocation, Income Uncertainty and Households' Flight from Risk," IZA Discussion Papers 10408, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. William Greene & Mark N Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Estimating the Standard Errors of Individual-Specific Parameters in Random Parameters Models," Discussion Paper Series 2014_01, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Jan 2014.
  3. Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Conventional and Unconventional Votes: A Tale of Three Monetary Policy Committees," Discussion Paper Series 2014_11, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Dec 2014.
  4. William H.Greene & Max Gillman & Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2013. "The Tempered Ordered Probit (TOP) model with an application to monetary policy," Discussion Paper Series 2013_10, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Sep 2013.
  5. Christopher Spencer & Paul Temple, 2012. "Alternative Paths of Learning: Standardisation and Growth in Britain, 1901-2009," Discussion Paper Series 2012_10, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Oct 2012.
  6. Robert Brooks & Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2012. "Inflated Ordered Outcomes," Discussion Paper Series 2012_09, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Oct 2012.
  7. Vasco Gabriel & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer & Bo Yang, 2008. "On the (ir)relevance of direct supply-side effects of monetary policy," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0408, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  8. Harris, Mark & Spencer, Christopher, 2008. "Decade of dissent: explaining the dissent voting behavior of Bank of England MPC members," MPRA Paper 9100, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Vasco J. Gabriel & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer, 2008. "How forward-looking is the Fed? Direct estimates from a ‘Calvo-type’ rule," NIPE Working Papers 09/2008, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
  10. Brooks, Robert & Harris, Mark & Spencer, Christopher, 2007. "An Inflated Ordered Probit Model of Monetary Policy: Evidence from MPC Voting Data," MPRA Paper 8509, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Christopher Spencer, 2006. "The Dissent Voting Behaviour of Bank of England MPC Members," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0306, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  12. Christopher Spencer, 2006. "Reaction Functions of Bank of England MPC Members: Insiders versus Outsiders," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0606, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  13. Parimal Kanti Bag & Paul Levine & Chris Spencer, 2005. "A Note on: Jury Size and the Free Rider Problem," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1705, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  14. Christopher Spencer, 2005. "Consensus Formation in Monetary Policy Committees," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1505, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  15. Paul Temple & Robert Witt & Chris Spencer, 2004. "Institutions and Long-Run Growth in the UK: the Role of Standards," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1004, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

Articles

  1. Christopher Spencer & Paul Temple, 2016. "Standards, learning, and growth in Britain, 1901–2009," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 69(2), pages 627-652, May.
  2. Asako, Kazumi & Spencer, Christopher & Liu, Zhentao, 2015. "Objectives and Makings of Monetary Policy in Japan," Economic Review, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 66(2), pages 97-114, April.
  3. Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Monetary Policy Committees and DeGrootian Consensus," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 1291-1302.
  4. Brooks, Robert & Harris, Mark N. & Spencer, Christopher, 2012. "Inflated ordered outcomes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 683-686.
  5. Mark Harris & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer, 2011. "A decade of dissent: explaining the dissent voting behavior of Bank of England MPC members," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(3), pages 413-442, March.
  6. Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2009. "The Policy Choices and Reaction Functions of Bank of England MPC Members," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 482-499, October.
  7. Gabriel, Vasco J. & Levine, Paul & Spencer, Christopher, 2009. "How forward-looking is the Fed? Direct estimates from a 'Calvo-type' rule," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 92-95, August.
  8. Christopher Spencer & Paul Levine & Parimal Bag, 2006. "A note on: jury size and the free rider problem," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(3), pages 1-12.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Robert Brooks & Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2012. "Inflated Ordered Outcomes," Discussion Paper Series 2012_09, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Oct 2012.

    Cited by:

    1. William H.Greene & Max Gillman & Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2013. "The Tempered Ordered Probit (TOP) model with an application to monetary policy," Discussion Paper Series 2013_10, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Sep 2013.
    2. Sirchenko Andrei, 2012. "A model for ordinal responses with an application to policy interest rate," EERC Working Paper Series 12/13e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    3. William Greene & Mark N Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Estimating the Standard Errors of Individual-Specific Parameters in Random Parameters Models," Discussion Paper Series 2014_01, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Jan 2014.
    4. Belderbos, Rene & Ikeuchi, Kenta & Fukao, Kyoji & Kim, Young Gak & Kwon, Hyeog Ug, 2013. "Plant Productivity Dynamics and Private and Public R&D Spillovers: Technological, Geographic and Relational Proximity," CEI Working Paper Series 2013-05, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    5. Jung, Alexander & El-Shagi, Makram, 2015. "Has the publication of minutes helped markets to predict the monetary policy decisions of the Bank of England's MPC?," Working Paper Series 1808, European Central Bank.
    6. El-Shagi, Makram & Jung, Alexander, 2015. "Have minutes helped markets to predict the MPC's monetary policy decisions?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 222-234.

  2. Vasco Gabriel & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer & Bo Yang, 2008. "On the (ir)relevance of direct supply-side effects of monetary policy," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0408, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

    Cited by:

    1. Jones, Barry E. & Stracca, Livio, 2008. "Does money matter in the IS curve? The case of the UK," Working Paper Series 904, European Central Bank.
    2. Steffen Henzel & Oliver Hülsewig & Eric Mayer & Timo Wollmershäuser, 2007. "The Price Puzzle Revisited: Can the Cost Channel Explain a Rise in Inflation after a Monetary Policy Shock?," CESifo Working Paper Series 2039, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Schmidt Sebastian, 2011. "The Cost Channel, Indeterminacy, and Price-Level versus Inflation Stabilization," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-17, January.

  3. Harris, Mark & Spencer, Christopher, 2008. "Decade of dissent: explaining the dissent voting behavior of Bank of England MPC members," MPRA Paper 9100, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Jan Marc Berk & Beata Bierut & Ellen Meade, 2010. "The Dynamic Voting Patterns of the Bank of England's MPC," DNB Working Papers 261, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Neuenkirch, Matthias & Tillmann, Peter, 2014. "Superstar Central Bankers," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100489, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. William H.Greene & Max Gillman & Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2013. "The Tempered Ordered Probit (TOP) model with an application to monetary policy," Discussion Paper Series 2013_10, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Sep 2013.
    4. Riboni, Alessandro & Ruge-Murcia, Francisco, 2014. "Dissent in monetary policy decisions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 137-154.
    5. Hansen, Stephen & McMahon, Michael, 2011. "How Experts Decide : Identifying Preferences versus Signals from Policy Decisions," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 963, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    6. Lähner, Tom, 2015. "Inconsistent voting behavior in the FOMC," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-546, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    7. Bennani, Hamza, 2015. "Dissecting the brains of central bankers: the case of the ECB's Governing Council members on reforms," MPRA Paper 62371, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Francisco RUGE-MURCIA & Alessandro RIBONI, 2016. "Collective Versus Individual Decisionmaking : A Case Study of the Bank of Israel Law," Cahiers de recherche 06-2016, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
    9. Potrafke, Niklas, 2013. "Minority positions in the German Council of Economic Experts: A political economic analysis," Munich Reprints in Economics 19290, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    10. A. Jung, 2013. "Policymakers’ Interest Rate Preferences: Recent Evidence for Three Monetary Policy Committees," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(3), pages 150-197, September.
    11. Bernd Hayo & Ummad Mazhar, 2011. "Monetary Policy Committee Transparency: Measurement,Determinants, and Economic Effects," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201140, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    12. Eichler, Stefan & Lähner, Tom & Noth, Felix, 2016. "Regional Banking Instability and FOMC Voting," IWH Discussion Papers 15/2016, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    13. Stephen Eliot Hansen & Michael McMahon, 2010. "What do outside experts bring to a committee? Evidence from the Bank of England," Economics Working Papers 1238, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    14. Carsten Hefeker & Blandine Zimmer, 2015. "Optimal Conservatism and Collective Monetary Policymaking under Uncertainty," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 259-278, April.
    15. Donato Masciandaro & Paola Profeta & Davide Romelli, 2016. "Gender and Monetary Policymaking: Trends and Drivers," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1512, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    16. Paolo Balduzzi & Clara Graziano & Annalisa Luporini, 2011. "Voting in Small Committees," Working Papers - Economics wp2011_01.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    17. Hamza Bennani & Etienne Farvaque & Piotr Stanek, 2015. "FOMC members’ incentives to disagree: regional motives and background influences," NBP Working Papers 221, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    18. Matthias Neuenkirch & Peter Tillmann, 2013. "Does a Good Central Banker make a Difference?," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201354, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    19. Matthias Neuenkirch & Florian Neumeier, 2015. "Party affiliation rather than former occupation: the background of central bank governors and its effect on monetary policy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(17), pages 1424-1429, November.
    20. Roman Horváth & Kateøina Šmídková & Jan Zápal & Marek Rusnák, 2012. "Dissent Voting Behavior of Central Bankers: What Do We Really Know?," Working Papers IES 2012/05, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Feb 2012.
    21. Brandon Schaufele, 2013. "Dissent in Parliament as Reputation Building," Working Papers 1301E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    22. Hamza Bennani, 2012. "National influences inside the ECB: an assessment from central bankers' statements," Working Papers hal-00992646, HAL.
    23. Eijffinger, Sylvester C W & Mahieu, Ronald J & Raes, Louis, 2013. "Inferring hawks and doves from voting records," CEPR Discussion Papers 9418, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    24. Belderbos, Rene & Ikeuchi, Kenta & Fukao, Kyoji & Kim, Young Gak & Kwon, Hyeog Ug, 2013. "Plant Productivity Dynamics and Private and Public R&D Spillovers: Technological, Geographic and Relational Proximity," CEI Working Paper Series 2013-05, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    25. Stephen Hansen & Carlos Velasco Rivera & Michael McMahon, 2013. "How Experts Decide: Preferences or Private Assessments on a Monetary Policy Committee?," CAMA Working Papers 2013-19, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    26. David-Jan Jansen & Richhild Moessner, 2016. "Communicating dissent on monetary policy: Evidence from central bank minutes," DNB Working Papers 512, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    27. Smales, Lee A. & Apergis, Nick, 2016. "The influence of FOMC member characteristics on the monetary policy decision-making process," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 216-231.
    28. Jung, Alexander & El-Shagi, Makram, 2015. "Has the publication of minutes helped markets to predict the monetary policy decisions of the Bank of England's MPC?," Working Paper Series 1808, European Central Bank.
    29. Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Conventional and Unconventional Votes: A Tale of Three Monetary Policy Committees," Discussion Paper Series 2014_11, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Dec 2014.
    30. Francesc Trillas Jané, 2016. "Behavioral Regulatory Agencies," Working Papers wpdea1606, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    31. Stefan Eichler & Tom Lähner, 2014. "Forecast dispersion, dissenting votes, and monetary policy preferences of FOMC members: the role of individual career characteristics and political aspects," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(3), pages 429-453, September.
    32. Sylvester Eijffinger & Ronald Mahieu & Louis Raes, 2016. "Monetary Policy Committees, Voting Behavior and Ideal Points," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1628, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    33. Bennani, Hamza & Farvaque, Etienne & Stanek, Piotr, 2018. "Influence of regional cycles and personal background on FOMC members’ preferences and disagreement," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 416-424.
    34. Horváth, Roman & Jonášová, Júlia, 2015. "Central banks' voting records, the financial crisis and future monetary policy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 229-243.
    35. El-Shagi, Makram & Jung, Alexander, 2015. "Have minutes helped markets to predict the MPC's monetary policy decisions?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 222-234.
    36. Chortareas, Georgios & Noikokyris, Emmanouil, 2014. "Monetary policy and stock returns under the MPC and inflation targeting," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 109-116.
    37. Eichler, Stefan & Lähner, Tom, 2017. "Career experience, political effects, and voting behavior in the Riksbank’s Monetary Policy Committee," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 55-58.
    38. Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Monetary Policy Committees and DeGrootian Consensus," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 1291-1302.

  4. Vasco J. Gabriel & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer, 2008. "How forward-looking is the Fed? Direct estimates from a ‘Calvo-type’ rule," NIPE Working Papers 09/2008, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.

    Cited by:

    1. Eurilton Araújo & Débora Gouveia, 2013. "Calvo-type rules and the forward-looking behavior of inflation targeting central banks," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 2042-2051.
    2. Best Gabriela & Kapinos Pavel, 2016. "Monetary policy and news shocks: are Taylor rules forward-looking?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 335-360, June.
    3. Alexandre, Fernando & Portela, Miguel & Sá, Carla, 2008. "Admission Conditions and Graduates' Employability," IZA Discussion Papers 3530, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Vasco Gabriel & Paul Levine & Joseph Pearlman & Bo Yang, 2010. "An Estimated DSGE Model of the Indian Economy," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1210, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    5. Ida Wolden Bache & Øistein Røislanda & Kjersti Næss Torstensen, 2011. "Interest Rate Smoothing and "Calvo-Type" Interest Rate Rules: A Comment on Levine, McAdam, and Pearlman (2007)," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(3), pages 79-90, September.
    6. Paulo Bastos & Natália P. Monteiro, 2011. "Managers and Wage Policies," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(4), pages 957-984, December.
    7. Ali, Syed Zahid & Anwar, Sajid, 2017. "Exchange rate pass through, cost channel to monetary policy transmission, adaptive learning, and the price puzzle," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 69-82.
    8. Seip, Knut L. & McNown, Robert, 2013. "Monetary policy and stability during six periods in US economic history: 1959–2008: a novel, nonlinear monetary policy rule," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 307-325.

  5. Brooks, Robert & Harris, Mark & Spencer, Christopher, 2007. "An Inflated Ordered Probit Model of Monetary Policy: Evidence from MPC Voting Data," MPRA Paper 8509, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Rebeca I. Muñoz Torres & David Shepherd, 2014. "Inflation Targeting and the Consistency of Monetary Policy Decisions in Mexico: an Empirical Analysis with Discrete Choice Models," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82, pages 21-46, December.
    2. El-Shagi, Makram & von Schweinitz, Gregor, 2017. "Why they keep missing: An empirical investigation of rational inattention of rating agencies," IWH Discussion Papers 1/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    3. Charemza, Wojciech & Ladley, Daniel, 2016. "Central banks’ forecasts and their bias: Evidence, effects and explanation," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 804-817.
    4. Roman Horváth & Kateřina Šmídková & Jan Zápal, 2012. "Central Banks' Voting Records and Future Policy," Working Papers 316, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    5. William H. Greene & David A. Hensher, 2008. "Modeling Ordered Choices: A Primer and Recent Developments," Working Papers 08-26, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    6. Groth, Charlotta & Wheeler, Tracy, 2008. "The behaviour of the MPC: Gradualism, inaction and individual voting patterns," Discussion Papers 21, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.
    7. Wojciech Charemza & Daniel Ladley, 2012. "MPC Voting, Forecasting and Inflation," Discussion Papers in Economics 12/23, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Jan 2013.

  6. Christopher Spencer, 2006. "The Dissent Voting Behaviour of Bank of England MPC Members," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0306, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

    Cited by:

    1. Riboni, Alessandro & Ruge-Murcia, Francisco, 2014. "Dissent in monetary policy decisions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 137-154.
    2. Hansen, Stephen & McMahon, Michael, 2011. "How Experts Decide : Identifying Preferences versus Signals from Policy Decisions," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 963, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    3. Stephen Hansen & Michael F. McMahon, 2008. "Delayed Doves: MPC Voting Behaviour of Externals," CEP Discussion Papers dp0862, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Bernd Hayo & Pierre-Guillaume Méon, 2011. "Behind closed doors: Revealing the ECB’s Decision Rule," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201135, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    5. Stephen Eliot Hansen & Michael McMahon, 2010. "What do outside experts bring to a committee? Evidence from the Bank of England," Economics Working Papers 1238, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    6. Jan Marc Berk & Beata K. Bierut, 2010. "Monetary Policy Committees: Meetings And Outcomes," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(4), pages 569-588, October.
    7. Paolo Balduzzi & Clara Graziano & Annalisa Luporini, 2011. "Voting in Small Committees," Working Papers - Economics wp2011_01.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    8. Berk, Jan Marc & Bierut, Beata K., 2011. "Communication in a monetary policy committee," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 791-801.
    9. Alessandro Riboni & Francisco J. Ruge-Murcia, 2008. "Preference Heterogeneity in Monetary Policy Committees," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 4(1), pages 213-233, March.
    10. Stephen Hansen & Carlos Velasco Rivera & Michael McMahon, 2013. "How Experts Decide: Preferences or Private Assessments on a Monetary Policy Committee?," CAMA Working Papers 2013-19, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    11. Hix, Simon & Hoyland, Bjorn & Vivyan, Nick, 2007. "From doves to hawks: a spatial analysis of voting in the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England, 1997-2007," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25199, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Groth, Charlotta & Wheeler, Tracy, 2008. "The behaviour of the MPC: Gradualism, inaction and individual voting patterns," Discussion Papers 21, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.
    13. Besley, Timothy & Meads, Neil & Surico, Paolo, 2007. "Insiders versus Outsiders in Monetary Policy-Making," Discussion Papers 20, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.
    14. Hansen, Stephen & McMahon, Michael & Velasco Rivera, Carlos, 2014. "Preferences or private assessments on a monetary policy committee?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 16-32.

  7. Christopher Spencer, 2006. "Reaction Functions of Bank of England MPC Members: Insiders versus Outsiders," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0606, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Hansen & Michael F. McMahon, 2008. "Delayed Doves: MPC Voting Behaviour of Externals," CEP Discussion Papers dp0862, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Mikael Apel & Carl Andreas Claussen & Petra Gerlach-Kristen & Petra Lennartsdotter & Øistein Røisland, 2013. "Monetary policy decisions – comparing theory and “inside” information from MPC members," Working Paper 2013/03, Norges Bank.
    3. Berk, Jan Marc & Bierut, Beata K., 2011. "Communication in a monetary policy committee," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 791-801.
    4. Brooks, Robert & Harris, Mark & Spencer, Christopher, 2007. "An Inflated Ordered Probit Model of Monetary Policy: Evidence from MPC Voting Data," MPRA Paper 8509, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Alexander Jung & Gergely Kiss, 2012. "Voting by monetary policy committees: evidence from the CEE inflation-targeting countries," MNB Working Papers 2012/2, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    6. Jakub Borowski & Adam Czerniak & Krystian Jaworski, 2014. "The quest for determinants of Chinese exchange rate policy," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 45(5), pages 407-432.
    7. Mark Harris & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer, 2011. "A decade of dissent: explaining the dissent voting behavior of Bank of England MPC members," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(3), pages 413-442, March.
    8. Besley, Timothy & Meads, Neil & Surico, Paolo, 2007. "Insiders versus Outsiders in Monetary Policy-Making," Discussion Papers 20, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.
    9. Mikael Apel & Carl Andreas Claussen & Petra Lennartsdotter & Øistein Røisland, 2015. "Monetary Policy Committees: Comparing Theory and "Inside" Information from MPC Members," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(4), pages 47-89, December.
    10. Jung, Alexander & Kiss, Gergely, 2012. "Preference heterogeneity in the CEE inflation-targeting countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 445-460.
    11. Christopher Spencer, 2006. "The Dissent Voting Behaviour of Bank of England MPC Members," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0306, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

  8. Christopher Spencer, 2005. "Consensus Formation in Monetary Policy Committees," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1505, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

    Cited by:

    1. Petra Gerlach-Kristen, 2008. "The Role of the Chairman in Setting Monetary Policy: Individualistic vs. Autocratically Collegial MPCs," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 4(3), pages 119-143, September.
    2. Vidal, Jean-Pierre & Maurin, Vincent, 2012. "Monetary policy deliberations: committee size and voting rules," Working Paper Series 1434, European Central Bank.
    3. Christopher Spencer, 2006. "The Dissent Voting Behaviour of Bank of England MPC Members," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0306, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

  9. Paul Temple & Robert Witt & Chris Spencer, 2004. "Institutions and Long-Run Growth in the UK: the Role of Standards," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1004, School of Economics, University of Surrey.

    Cited by:

    1. Knut Blind & Andre Jungmittag, 2008. "The impact of patents and standards on macroeconomic growth: a panel approach covering four countries and 12 sectors," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 51-60, February.
    2. Hany El Shamy & Paul Temple, 2008. "Entrepreneurship, Spillovers and Productivity Growth in the Small Firm Sector of UK Manufacturing," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0708, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    3. Productivity Commission, 2006. "Standard Setting and Laboratory Accreditation," Research Reports, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia, number 22.

Articles

  1. Brooks, Robert & Harris, Mark N. & Spencer, Christopher, 2012. "Inflated ordered outcomes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 683-686.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Mark Harris & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer, 2011. "A decade of dissent: explaining the dissent voting behavior of Bank of England MPC members," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(3), pages 413-442, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2009. "The Policy Choices and Reaction Functions of Bank of England MPC Members," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 482-499, October.

    Cited by:

    1. William H.Greene & Max Gillman & Mark N. Harris & Christopher Spencer, 2013. "The Tempered Ordered Probit (TOP) model with an application to monetary policy," Discussion Paper Series 2013_10, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Sep 2013.
    2. Lähner, Tom, 2015. "Inconsistent voting behavior in the FOMC," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-546, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    3. Stephen Hansen & Michael F. McMahon, 2008. "Delayed Doves: MPC Voting Behaviour of Externals," CEP Discussion Papers dp0862, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Brooks, Robert & Harris, Mark N. & Spencer, Christopher, 2012. "Inflated ordered outcomes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 683-686.
    5. Donato Masciandaro & Paola Profeta & Davide Romelli, 2016. "Gender and Monetary Policymaking: Trends and Drivers," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1512, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    6. Roman Horváth & Kateøina Šmídková & Jan Zápal & Marek Rusnák, 2012. "Dissent Voting Behavior of Central Bankers: What Do We Really Know?," Working Papers IES 2012/05, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Feb 2012.
    7. Eijffinger, Sylvester C W & Mahieu, Ronald J & Raes, Louis, 2013. "Inferring hawks and doves from voting records," CEPR Discussion Papers 9418, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Belderbos, Rene & Ikeuchi, Kenta & Fukao, Kyoji & Kim, Young Gak & Kwon, Hyeog Ug, 2013. "Plant Productivity Dynamics and Private and Public R&D Spillovers: Technological, Geographic and Relational Proximity," CEI Working Paper Series 2013-05, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    9. Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Conventional and Unconventional Votes: A Tale of Three Monetary Policy Committees," Discussion Paper Series 2014_11, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Dec 2014.
    10. Mark Harris & Paul Levine & Christopher Spencer, 2011. "A decade of dissent: explaining the dissent voting behavior of Bank of England MPC members," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(3), pages 413-442, March.
    11. Stefan Eichler & Tom Lähner, 2014. "Forecast dispersion, dissenting votes, and monetary policy preferences of FOMC members: the role of individual career characteristics and political aspects," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(3), pages 429-453, September.
    12. Sylvester Eijffinger & Ronald Mahieu & Louis Raes, 2016. "Monetary Policy Committees, Voting Behavior and Ideal Points," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1628, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    13. Christopher Spencer, 2014. "Monetary Policy Committees and DeGrootian Consensus," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 1291-1302.

  4. Gabriel, Vasco J. & Levine, Paul & Spencer, Christopher, 2009. "How forward-looking is the Fed? Direct estimates from a 'Calvo-type' rule," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 92-95, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 17 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (11) 2006-01-24 2006-04-01 2006-04-01 2008-05-05 2008-06-13 2008-06-13 2008-06-21 2008-12-07 2012-10-27 2013-11-09 2014-12-24. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (10) 2006-01-24 2006-04-01 2006-04-01 2008-05-05 2008-06-13 2008-06-13 2008-06-21 2008-12-07 2012-10-27 2013-11-09. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (9) 2006-04-01 2006-04-01 2008-05-05 2008-06-13 2008-06-13 2008-06-21 2008-12-07 2013-11-09 2014-12-24. Author is listed
  4. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (5) 2006-04-01 2008-06-21 2012-10-27 2013-11-09 2014-12-24. Author is listed
  5. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (3) 2006-04-01 2008-05-05 2013-11-09
  6. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (3) 2012-10-27 2013-11-09 2014-01-17
  7. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2006-04-01 2008-06-21
  8. NEP-RMG: Risk Management (2) 2017-01-01 2017-01-08
  9. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (2) 2008-06-13 2017-01-08
  10. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2006-01-24
  11. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2008-06-13
  12. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2008-06-21
  13. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2006-01-24
  14. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2012-10-27
  15. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2006-01-24
  16. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2012-10-27
  17. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2006-01-24

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