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Entrepreneurship, Spillovers and Productivity Growth in the Small Firm Sector of UK Manufacturing

Author

Listed:
  • Hany El Shamy

    (University of Surrey)

  • Paul Temple

    (University of Surrey)

Abstract

This paper considers the sources of technological change and productivity growth in the small firm sector of UK manufacturing over the period 1973- 2002, focusing on the mechanisms by which spillovers occur between the large firms which perform the bulk of R&D and smaller firms which are the recipients. It is argued that the current volume of domestic R&D generates profitable and high productivity opportunities for smaller firms. However this mechanism ignores the ways in which R&D also contributes to the more general knowledge base available to small firms as codified information which frequently takes the measurable form of industrial standards. A simple model of labour demand among small manufacturing is developed which employs two measures of technological activity intended to capture both these channels. A co-integrating relationship based upon an augmented labour demand equation is established for UK manufacturing, showing the relevance of both channels for the explanation of productivity growth in the small firm sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Hany El Shamy & Paul Temple, 2008. "Entrepreneurship, Spillovers and Productivity Growth in the Small Firm Sector of UK Manufacturing," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0708, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  • Handle: RePEc:sur:surrec:0708
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    File URL: https://repec.som.surrey.ac.uk/2008/DP07-08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
    2. Paul Temple & Robert Witt & Chris Spencer, 2004. "Institutions and Long-Run Growth in the UK: the Role of Standards," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1004, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Key Words: Small firms; productivity; technological change; R&D; standards.;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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