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Andrew C Pickering

Personal Details

First Name:Andrew
Middle Name:C
Last Name:Pickering
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppi32
http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/our-people/staff-profiles/andrew-pickering/
Department of Economics and Related Studies University of York York YO10 5DD United Kingdom

Affiliation

Department of Economics and Related Studies
University of York

York, United Kingdom
http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/

: (0)1904 323776

York YO10 5DD
RePEc:edi:deyoruk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Weijie Luo & Andrew Pickering & Paulo Santos Monteiro, 2017. "Inequality and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 17/02, Department of Economics, University of York.
  2. Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2016. "Polarization and Corruption in America," Discussion Papers 16/09, Department of Economics, University of York.
  3. Amrita Dhillon & Andrew Pickering & Tomas Sjöström, 2016. "Sovereign Debt - Election Concerns and the Democratic Disadvantage," Discussion Papers 16/13, Department of Economics, University of York.
  4. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2016. "Labour Costs and the Size of Government," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01350614, HAL.
  5. Andrew Pickering & Sheraz Rajput, 2015. "Inequality and the composition of taxes," Discussion Papers 15/04, Department of Economics, University of York.
  6. Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2014. "Polarization and Government Debt," Discussion Papers 14/10, Department of Economics, University of York.
  7. Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2014. "Ideological Polarization and the Media," Discussion Papers 14/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
  8. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2013. "The Labor Share and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 13/02, Department of Economics, University of York.
  9. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2013. "Political Competition, Political Donations, Economic Policy and Growth," Discussion Papers 13/21, Department of Economics, University of York.
  10. Andrew C. Pickering & James Rockey, 2012. "Ideology and the growth of US state government," Working Papers 2012/6, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  11. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2010. "Party Activists, Campaign Funding and the Quality of Government," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/252, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  12. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2008. "Ideology, Competence and Luck: What determines general election results?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 08/607, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  13. Andrew Pickering & Hector Valle, 2008. "Openness, imported commodities and the Phillips Curve," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 08/608, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  14. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2007. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 07/599, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  15. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2004. "The Production Function for Votes," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 04/559, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  16. Pickering, Andrew, 2003. "The oil extraction puzzle: theory and evidence," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 166, Royal Economic Society.
  17. Maloney, John & Andrew Pickering & Kaddour Hadri, 2002. "Which Type of Central Bank Smooths the Political Business Cycle?," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 135, Royal Economic Society.
  18. John Maloney & Bernard Pearson & Andrew Pickering, 2001. "Behind the cube rule: implications of, and evidence against a fractal electoral geography," Discussion Papers 0103, Exeter University, Department of Economics.
  19. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, "undated". "Voting and the macroeconomy: separating trend from cycle," Discussion Papers 11/14, Department of Economics, University of York.

Articles

  1. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2018. "The Economic Consequences of Political Donation Limits," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 85(339), pages 479-517, July.
  2. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2017. "Labour Costs and the Size of Government," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(2), pages 251-275, April.
  3. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2015. "Voting and the economic cycle," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(1), pages 119-133, January.
  4. Melki, Mickael & Pickering, Andrew, 2014. "Ideological polarization and the media," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(1), pages 36-39.
  5. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2013. "Ideology and the size of US state government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 443-465, September.
  6. John Maloney & Andrew C. Pickering, 2013. "Party Activists, Campaign Funding, and the Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 210-238, February.
  7. Pickering Andrew & Valle Héctor A., 2012. "Openness, Imported Commodities and the Sacrifice Ratio," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-26, March.
  8. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2011. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 907-919, August.
  9. Pickering, Andrew, 2008. "The oil reserves production relationship," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 352-370, March.
  10. John Maloney & Andrew C. Pickering & Kaddour Hadri, 2003. "Political Business Cycles and Central Bank Independence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 167-181, March.
  11. John Maloney & Bernard Pearson & Andrew Pickering, 2003. "Behind the cube rule: implications of, and evidence against a fractal electoral geography," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(8), pages 1405-1414, August.
  12. Andrew Pickering, 2002. "The Discovery Decline Phenomenon: Microeconometric Evidence from the UK Continental Shelf," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 57-71.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2013. "The Labor Share and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 13/02, Department of Economics, University of York.

    Mentioned in:

    1. How the wage squeeze helps the Tories
      by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2013-02-09 19:36:20
    2. On the causality between the labor income share and the size of governments
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-02-14 21:17:00

Working papers

  1. Weijie Luo & Andrew Pickering & Paulo Santos Monteiro, 2017. "Inequality and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 17/02, Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Weijie Luo, 2017. "Inequality and Growth in the 21st Century," Discussion Papers 17/18, Department of Economics, University of York.

  2. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2016. "Labour Costs and the Size of Government," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01350614, HAL.

    Cited by:

    1. Weijie Luo, 2017. "Inequality and Growth in the 21st Century," Discussion Papers 17/18, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Weijie Luo & Andrew Pickering & Paulo Santos Monteiro, 2017. "Inequality and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 17/02, Department of Economics, University of York.

  3. Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2014. "Ideological Polarization and the Media," Discussion Papers 14/11, Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Sekeris, Petros & Vasilakis, Chrysovalantis, 2016. "The Mediterranean Refugees Crisis and Extreme Right Parties: Evidence from Greece," MPRA Paper 72222, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Andrew C. Pickering & James Rockey, 2012. "Ideology and the growth of US state government," Working Papers 2012/6, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The Size and Scope of Government in the US States: Does Party Ideology Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4246, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.

  5. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2010. "Party Activists, Campaign Funding and the Quality of Government," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/252, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2013. "Political Competition, Political Donations, Economic Policy and Growth," Discussion Papers 13/21, Department of Economics, University of York.

  6. Andrew Pickering & Hector Valle, 2008. "Openness, imported commodities and the Phillips Curve," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 08/608, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Dieppe, Alistair & Georgiadis, Georgios & Ricci, Martino & Van Robays, Ine & van Roye, Björn, 2017. "ECB-Global: introducing ECB's global macroeconomic model for spillover analysis," Working Paper Series 2045, European Central Bank.

  7. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2007. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 07/599, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, "undated". "Voting and the macroeconomy: separating trend from cycle," Discussion Papers 11/14, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Bjørnskov, Christian & Rode, Martin, 2016. "And Yet It Grows: Crisis, Ideology, and Interventionist Policy Ratchets," Working Paper Series 1135, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Pierpaolo Parrotta & Dario Pozzoli & Davide Sala, 2016. "Ethnic Diversity and Firms' Export Behavior," Post-Print hal-01512787, HAL.
    4. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The Size and Scope of Government in the US States: Does Party Ideology Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4246, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Florian Chatagny, 2015. "Incentive Effects of Fiscal Rules on the Finance Minister's Behaviour: Evidence from Revenue Projections in Swiss Cantons," CESifo Working Paper Series 5223, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Partisan Politics: The Empirical Evidence from OECD Panel Studies," CESifo Working Paper Series 6024, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2016. "Labour Costs and the Size of Government," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01350614, HAL.
    8. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.
    9. Belke, Ansgar & Potrafke, Niklas, 2009. "Does Government Ideology Matter in Monetary Policy? – A Panel Data Analysis for OECD Countries," Ruhr Economic Papers 94, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    10. Toke S Aidt & Vitor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2016. "Shades of red and blue: Political ideology and sustainable development," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1635, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    11. Toke S. Aidt & Vitor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2018. "Shades of red and blue: government ideology and sustainable development," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 175(3), pages 303-323, June.
    12. Herwartz, Helmut & Theilen, Bernd, 2017. "Ideology and redistribution through public spending," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 74-90.
    13. Benjamin Michallet & Giuseppe Gaeta & François Facchini, 2015. "Greening up or not? The determinants of political parties' environmental concern: an empirical analysis based on European data (1970-2008)," Working Papers halshs-01154006, HAL.
    14. Weijie Luo & Andrew Pickering & Paulo Santos Monteiro, 2017. "Inequality and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 17/02, Department of Economics, University of York.
    15. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke, 2015. "Globalization and Social Justice in OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 5210, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Andrew C. Pickering & James Rockey, 2012. "Ideology and the growth of US state government," Working Papers 2012/6, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    17. Andrew Pickering & Sheraz Rajput, 2015. "Inequality and the composition of taxes," Discussion Papers 15/04, Department of Economics, University of York.
    18. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke & Simone Winterer, 2015. "Das Wachstum der Verteidigungsausgaben in Deutschland (1951–2011): Welchen Einfluss haben die Parteien?," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 68(10), pages 19-26, May.
    19. Benjamin Michallet & Giuseppe Gaeta & François Facchini, 2015. "Greening up or not? The determinants of political parties' environmental concern: an empirical analysis based on European data (1970-2008)," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01154006, HAL.
    20. Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2014. "Polarization and Government Debt," Discussion Papers 14/10, Department of Economics, University of York.
    21. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2013. "The Labor Share and the Size of Government," Discussion Papers 13/02, Department of Economics, University of York.
    22. Benoît LE MAUX & Kristýna DOSTÁLOVÁ & Fabio PADOVANO, 2017. "Ideology and Public Policies: A Quasi-Experimental Test of the Hypothesis that Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-01-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.
    23. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2013. "Ideology and the size of US state government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 443-465, September.
    24. François Facchini & Mickaël Melki, 2013. "Political Ideology and Economic Growth: Evidence from the French Democracy," Post-Print halshs-00917617, HAL.
    25. Benoît Le Maux & Kristýna Dostálová & Fabio Padovano, 2017. "Ideology or Voters? A Quasi-Experimental Test of Why Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-05-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.

  8. Maloney, John & Andrew Pickering & Kaddour Hadri, 2002. "Which Type of Central Bank Smooths the Political Business Cycle?," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 135, Royal Economic Society.

    Cited by:

    1. John Maloney & Andrew C. Pickering & Kaddour Hadri, 2003. "Political Business Cycles and Central Bank Independence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 167-181, March.

  9. John Maloney & Bernard Pearson & Andrew Pickering, 2001. "Behind the cube rule: implications of, and evidence against a fractal electoral geography," Discussion Papers 0103, Exeter University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. John Maloney & Andrew C. Pickering & Kaddour Hadri, 2003. "Political Business Cycles and Central Bank Independence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 167-181, March.
    2. Selim Ergun, 2010. "From plurality rule to proportional representation," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 373-408, November.

Articles

  1. François Facchini & Mickael Melki & Andrew Pickering, 2017. "Labour Costs and the Size of Government," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(2), pages 251-275, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2015. "Voting and the economic cycle," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(1), pages 119-133, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Kirchgässner, Gebhard, 2016. "Voting and Popularity," Economics Working Paper Series 1618, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    2. Antoine Auberger, 2015. "The impact of economic and political factors on popularity for France (1981-2014)," Working Papers halshs-01264983, HAL.
    3. Adam, Antonis & Karanatsis, Konstas, 2016. "Sovereign Defaults and Political Regime Transitions," MPRA Paper 69062, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  3. Melki, Mickael & Pickering, Andrew, 2014. "Ideological polarization and the media," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(1), pages 36-39.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2013. "Ideology and the size of US state government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 443-465, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.
    2. Bjørnskov, Christian & Rode, Martin, 2016. "And Yet It Grows: Crisis, Ideology, and Interventionist Policy Ratchets," Working Paper Series 1135, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The Size and Scope of Government in the US States: Does Party Ideology Matter?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4246, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.
    5. Toke S. Aidt & Vitor Castro & Rodrigo Martins, 2018. "Shades of red and blue: government ideology and sustainable development," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 175(3), pages 303-323, June.
    6. Niklas Potrafke, 2017. "Government Ideology and Economic Policy-Making in the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 6444, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Benoît LE MAUX & Kristýna DOSTÁLOVÁ & Fabio PADOVANO, 2017. "Ideology and Public Policies: A Quasi-Experimental Test of the Hypothesis that Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-01-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.
    8. Niklas Potrafke & Margret Schneider & Christian Simon, 2013. "Zum Einfluss von Parteiideologie auf die Staatstätigkeit in den US-Bundesstaaten," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(11), pages 24-29, June.
    9. Robert A. Greer & Dwight V. Denison, 2016. "Determinants of Debt Concentration at the State Level," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(4), pages 111-130, December.
    10. Benoît Le Maux & Kristýna Dostálová & Fabio Padovano, 2017. "Ideology or Voters? A Quasi-Experimental Test of Why Left-Wing Governments Spend More," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2017-05-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.

  5. John Maloney & Andrew C. Pickering, 2013. "Party Activists, Campaign Funding, and the Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(1), pages 210-238, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Pickering Andrew & Valle Héctor A., 2012. "Openness, Imported Commodities and the Sacrifice Ratio," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-26, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Joseph Daniels & Sandeep Mazumder & David VanHoose, 2015. "Implications of Globalization for the Output-inflation Relationship: an Assessment," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 39-60, February.
    2. Watson, Anna, 2016. "Trade openness and inflation: The role of real and nominal price rigidities," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 137-169.
    3. Daniels, Joseph P. & VanHoose, David D., 2013. "Exchange-rate pass through, openness, and the sacrifice ratio," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 131-150.

  7. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2011. "Ideology and the Growth of Government," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 907-919, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Pickering, Andrew, 2008. "The oil reserves production relationship," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 352-370, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim & Abdollahzadeh, Negar, 2009. "Oil exploitation and the environmental Kuznets curve," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 371-374, January.
    2. Rodriguez, Xose Anton & Arias, Carlos, 2008. "The effects of resource depletion on coal mining productivity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 397-408, March.
    3. Guro Børnes Ringlund & Knut Einar Rosendahl & Terje Skjerpen, 2004. "Does oilrig activity react to oil price changes? An empirical investigation," Discussion Papers 372, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. Okullo, S.J. & Reynes, F. & Hofkes, M.W., 2014. "Modeling Peak Oil and the Geological Constraints on Oil Production," Discussion Paper 2014-036, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    5. Wetzstein, M. & Wetzstein, H., 2011. "Four myths surrounding U.S. biofuels," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4308-4312, July.
    6. Jochen Güntner, 2017. "How do oil producers respond to giant oil field discoveries?," Economics working papers 2017-04, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    7. Pål Boug & Ådne Cappelen & Anders Rygh Swensen, 2016. "Modelling OPEC behaviour. Theory and evidence," Discussion Papers 843, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    8. Fatih Karanfil & Luc-Désiré Omgba, 2017. "Reconsidering the scarcity factor in the dynamics of oil markets: An empirical investigation of the (mis)measurement of oil reserves," Post-Print hal-01639006, HAL.
    9. Diego Barril and Fernando Navajas, 2015. "Natural Gas Supply Behavior under Interventionism: The Case of Argentina," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    10. Barril, Diego & Navajas, Fernando H., 2011. "What drove down natural gas production in Argentina?," MPRA Paper 35726, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Nov 2011.
    11. Brandt, Adam R., 2010. "Review of mathematical models of future oil supply: Historical overview and synthesizing critique," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 3958-3974.
    12. Alla Fridman, 2018. "Partial privatization in an exhaustible resource industry," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 159-173, June.

  9. John Maloney & Andrew C. Pickering & Kaddour Hadri, 2003. "Political Business Cycles and Central Bank Independence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 167-181, March.

    Cited by:

    1. JoAnne Morris & Tonny Lybek, 2004. "Central Bank Governance; A Survey of Boards and Management," IMF Working Papers 04/226, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Ferré Carracedo, Montserrat & Manzano, Carolina, 2013. "Rational Partisan Theory with fiscal policy and an independent central bank," Working Papers 2072/211881, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    3. Ferré Carracedo, Montserrat & Manzano, Carolina, 2013. "Independent Central Banks: Low inflation at no cost?: A model with fiscal policy," Working Papers 2072/222196, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    4. Ahmet Emrah Tayyar, 2017. "Political Monetary Cycles In Coalition And Single Party Government Periods: A Case Study On Turkey," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 6, pages 89-111, December.
    5. Batool, Irem & Sieg, Gernot, 2009. "Pakistan, politics and political business cycles," Economics Department Working Paper Series 7, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Economics Department.
    6. Burton Abrams & Plamen Iossifov, 2006. "Does the Fed Contribute to a Political Business Cycle?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 129(3), pages 249-262, December.
    7. Jens Klose, 2012. "Political business cycles and monetary policy revisited–an application of a two-dimensional asymmetric Taylor reaction function," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 265-295, September.
    8. Fi̇li̇z Eryilmaz & Mehmet Mercan, 2015. "Political Budget Cycles: Evidence From Turkey," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 2, pages 5-14, April.
    9. Eric DUBOIS, "undated". "A Simple Politico-Economic Model to Predict Vote and Growth in France," EcoMod2004 330600045, EcoMod.

  10. John Maloney & Bernard Pearson & Andrew Pickering, 2003. "Behind the cube rule: implications of, and evidence against a fractal electoral geography," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(8), pages 1405-1414, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  11. Andrew Pickering, 2002. "The Discovery Decline Phenomenon: Microeconometric Evidence from the UK Continental Shelf," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 57-71.

    Cited by:

    1. Jakobsson, Kristofer & Söderbergh, Bengt & Snowden, Simon & Li, Chuan-Zhong & Aleklett, Kjell, 2012. "Oil exploration and perceptions of scarcity: The fallacy of early success," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1226-1233.
    2. Reynolds, Douglas B. & Kolodziej, Marek, 2008. "Former Soviet Union oil production and GDP decline: Granger causality and the multi-cycle Hubbert curve," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 271-289, March.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 16 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (11) 2004-07-26 2007-11-10 2008-11-25 2011-01-16 2012-04-23 2013-09-06 2014-08-09 2014-08-09 2016-07-30 2016-11-06 2016-11-13. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (8) 2004-07-26 2007-11-10 2008-11-25 2013-09-06 2014-08-09 2014-08-09 2016-07-30 2016-11-06. Author is listed
  3. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (6) 2007-11-10 2012-04-23 2013-02-03 2013-09-06 2015-04-02 2017-03-05. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2008-11-25 2015-04-02 2017-03-05
  5. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (2) 2002-07-08 2008-11-25
  6. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (2) 2015-04-02 2017-03-05
  7. NEP-RMG: Risk Management (2) 2016-11-06 2016-11-13
  8. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (1) 2014-08-09
  9. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-02-03
  10. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2016-07-30
  11. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (1) 2008-11-25
  12. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2016-11-06

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