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Polarization and Corruption in America

Listed author(s):
  • Mickael Melki
  • Andrew Pickering

The hypothesis that ideological polarization reduces corruption is tested using panel data from the US. To identify the causal effect of polarization, polarization is instrumented with lagged political position-taking in geographically neighboring states. Polarization is found to significantly reduce corruption. Consistent with the idea that ideological distance imposes additional electoral discipline on politicians, the beneficial effect of polarization is found to increase when political competition is high and when incumbent governors are eligible to run for office.

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File URL: https://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/discussionpapers/2016/1609.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of York in its series Discussion Papers with number 16/09.

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Date of creation: Jul 2016
Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:16/09
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom

Phone: (0)1904 323776
Web page: https://www.york.ac.uk/economics/
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