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Zum Einfluss von Parteiideologie auf die Staatstätigkeit in den US-Bundesstaaten

Author

Listed:
  • Niklas Potrafke
  • Margret Schneider
  • Christian Simon

Abstract

Eine neue Studie zeigt den Einfluss von Parteiideologie auf Wirtschaftspolitik in den US-Bundesstaaten auf. Demokraten haben die Staatstätigkeit ausgeweitet; Republikaner haben sie zurückgefahren. Insbesondere haben Republikaner die Arbeitsmärkte dereguliert. Problemlos implementiert werden können die Politik­unterschiede aber nur, wenn es keine geteilten Mehrheitsverhältnisse zwischen Exekutive und Legislative gibt.

Suggested Citation

  • Niklas Potrafke & Margret Schneider & Christian Simon, 2013. "Zum Einfluss von Parteiideologie auf die Staatstätigkeit in den US-Bundesstaaten," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(11), pages 24-29, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifosdt:v:66:y:2013:i:11:p:24-29
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chun-Ping Chang & Yoonbai Kim & Yung-hsiang Ying, 2009. "Economics and politics in the United States: a state-level investigation," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 343-354.
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    3. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2012. "Political Ideology and Economic Freedom Across Canadian Provinces," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 38(2), pages 143-166.
    4. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The size and scope of government in the US states: does party ideology matter?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(4), pages 687-714, August.
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    6. SHOR, BORIS & McCARTY, NOLAN, 2011. "The Ideological Mapping of American Legislatures," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 105(3), pages 530-551, August.
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    8. Andrew Pickering & James Rockey, 2013. "Ideology and the size of US state government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 443-465, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Staatsquote; Parteipolitik; Politische Partei; Öffentliche Ausgaben; Wirtschaftspolitik; USA;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H60 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - General

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