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Christopher S. Cotton

Personal Details

First Name:Christopher
Middle Name:S.
Last Name:Cotton
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco210
http://www.christophercotton.ca
Dunning Hall 230 Department of Economics Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Terminal Degree:2008 Department of Economics; Cornell University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Department
Queen's University

Kingston, Canada
http://www.econ.queensu.ca/

: (613) 533-2250
(613) 533-6668
Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6
RePEc:edi:qedquca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Raphael Boleslavsky & Bruce Carlin & Christopher Cotton, 2017. "Competing for Capital: Auditing and Credibility in Financial Reporting," Working Papers 1377, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  2. Christopher Cotton & Brent R. Hickman & Joseph P. Price, 2016. "Affirmative Action and Human Capital Investment: Theory and Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," Working Papers 1350, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  3. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2016. "Correcting for bias in hot hand analysis: Analyzing performance streaks in youth golf," Working Papers 1366, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  4. Marina Agranov & Christopher Cotton & Chloe Tergiman, 2016. "Persistence of Power: Repeated Multilateral Bargaining," Working Papers 1374, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  5. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2016. "Clueless Politicians," Working Papers 1341, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  6. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton & Haresh Gurnani, 2015. "Demonstrations and Price Competition in New Product Release," Working Papers 1347, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  7. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Limited Capacity in Project Selection: Competition Through Evidence Production," Working Papers 1343, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  8. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2015. "Which explanations for gender differences in competition are consistent with a simple theoretical model?," Working Papers 1342, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  9. Cotton, Christopher, 2015. "Competing for Attention," MPRA Paper 65715, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Campos, Sergio & Cotton, Christopher & Li, Cheng, 2015. "Deterrence effects under Twombly: on the costs of increasing pleading standards in litigation," MPRA Paper 65604, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Christopher Cotton & Brent R. Hickman & Joseph P. Price, 2014. "Affirmative Action and Human Capital Investment: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 20397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Luca Corazzini & Christopher Cotton & Paola Valbonesi, 2013. "Too many charities? Insight from an experiment with multiple public goods and contribution thresholds," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0171, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
  13. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Competing for the Attention of Policymakers," Working Papers 2013-14, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  14. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2012. "Profiling, Screening and Criminal Recruitment," Working Papers 2013-02, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  15. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2012. "Information and Extremism in Elections," Working Papers 2013-04, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  16. Christopher Cotton & Arnaud Dellis, 2012. "Informational Lobbying and Agenda Distortion," Working Papers 2013-03, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  17. Luca Corazzini, Christopher Cotton, Paola Valbonesi, 2012. "Salience, Coordination and Cooperation in Contributing to Threshold Public Goods," ISLA Working Papers 44, ISLA, Centre for research on Latin American Studies and Transition Economies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
  18. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2012. "Grade Inflation and Education Quality," Working Papers 2012-2, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  19. Ralph Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2011. "Learning More by Doing Less," Working Papers 2011-6, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  20. Christopher Cotton, 2010. "Evidence Revelation in Competitions for Access," Working Papers 2010-21, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  21. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2010. "The Gender Gap Cracks Under Pressure: A Detailed Look at Male and Female Performance Differences During Competitions," NBER Working Papers 16436, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  22. Christopher Cotton, 2010. "Pay-to-Play Politics: Informational lobbying and campaign finance reform when contributions buy access," Working Papers 2010-22, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  23. Christopher Cotton & Chang Liu, 2010. "100 Horsemen and the Empty City: A Game Theoretic Exploration of Deception in Chinese Military Legend," Working Papers 2010-22, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  24. Christopher Cotton, 2010. "Dynamic Legislative Bargaining with Endogenous Agenda Setting Authority," Working Papers 2010-20, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  25. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2010. "Causes of Gender Differences in Competition: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 2010-19, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  26. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2009. "Gender Differences Disappear with Exposure to Competition," Working Papers 2010-11, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  27. Christopher Cotton, 2009. "Competition for Access and Full Revelation of Evidence," Working Papers 2010-12, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  28. Christopher Cotton, 2009. "Sniping to Avoid the Endowment E ect in Auctions," Working Papers 2010-13, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  29. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "An Application Game with Fees and Time Costs," Working Papers 0904, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  30. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "Should We Tax or Cap Political Contributions? A Lobbying Model with Policy Favors and Access," Working Papers 0901, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  31. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "Access Fees in Politics," Working Papers 0903, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  32. Cotton, Christopher, 2007. "Informational Lobbying and Competition for Access," MPRA Paper 1842, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  33. Cotton, Christopher, 2007. "Multiple-bidding in auctions as bidders become confident of their private valuations," MPRA Paper 1844, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  34. Cotton, Christopher & Price, Joseph, 2006. "The Hot Hand, Competitive Experience, and Performance Differences by Gender," MPRA Paper 1843, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2018. "Limited capacity in project selection: competition through evidence production," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 65(2), pages 385-421, March.
  2. Christopher Cotton, 2016. "Competing for Attention: Lobbying Time-Constrained Politicians," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 18(4), pages 642-665, August.
  3. Christopher S. Cotton & Arnaud Déllis, 2016. "Informational Lobbying and Agenda Distortion," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(4), pages 762-793.
  4. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Grading Standards and Education Quality," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 248-279, May.
  5. S. Cotton, Christopher & Li, Cheng & McIntyre, Frank & P. Price, Joseph, 2015. "Which explanations for gender differences in competition are consistent with a simple theoretical model?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 56-67.
  6. Corazzini, Luca & Cotton, Christopher & Valbonesi, Paola, 2015. "Donor coordination in project funding: Evidence from a threshold public goods experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 16-29.
  7. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2015. "Profiling, Screening, and Criminal Recruitment," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(6), pages 964-985, December.
  8. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Information and Extremism in Elections," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 165-207, February.
  9. Campos, Sergio J. & Cotton, Christopher S. & Li, Cheng, 2015. "Deterrence effects under Twombly: On the costs of increasing pleading standards in litigation," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 61-71.
  10. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Submission Fees and Response Times in Academic Publishing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(1), pages 501-509, February.
  11. Cotton, Christopher & McIntyre, Frank & Price, Joseph, 2013. "Gender differences in repeated competition: Evidence from school math contests," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 52-66.
  12. Cotton, Christopher, 2012. "Pay-to-play politics: Informational lobbying and contribution limits when money buys access," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(3), pages 369-386.
  13. Cotton, Christopher, 2009. "Multiple bidding in auctions as bidders become confident of their private valuations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 148-150, September.
  14. Cotton, Christopher, 2009. "Should we tax or cap political contributions? A lobbying model with policy favors and access," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(7-8), pages 831-842, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "Should We Tax or Cap Political Contributions? A Lobbying Model with Policy Favors and Access," Working Papers 0901, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Tax political contributions
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2009-04-06 21:12:00

Working papers

  1. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2016. "Clueless Politicians," Working Papers 1341, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Li, Cheng, 2017. "A model of Bayesian persuasion with transfers," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 93-95.

  2. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton & Haresh Gurnani, 2015. "Demonstrations and Price Competition in New Product Release," Working Papers 1347, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Salvatore Piccolo & Aldo Pignataro, 2016. "Consumer Loss Aversion, Product Experimentation and Implicit Collusion," CSEF Working Papers 457, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.

  3. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Limited Capacity in Project Selection: Competition Through Evidence Production," Working Papers 1343, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton & Haresh Gurnani, 2015. "Demonstrations and Price Competition in New Product Release," Working Papers 1347, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

  4. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2015. "Which explanations for gender differences in competition are consistent with a simple theoretical model?," Working Papers 1342, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Luisa Herbst, 2016. "Who Pays to Win Again? The Joy of Winning in Contest Experiments," Working Papers tax-mpg-rps-2016-06, Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance.

  5. Campos, Sergio & Cotton, Christopher & Li, Cheng, 2015. "Deterrence effects under Twombly: on the costs of increasing pleading standards in litigation," MPRA Paper 65604, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Chulyoung, 2015. "Judge's Gate-Keeping Power and Deterrence of Negligent Acts: An Economic Analysis of Twombly and Iqbal," MPRA Paper 69836, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Chulyoung Kim, 2018. "Judge’s gate-keeping power and deterrence of negligent acts: an economic analysis of Twombly and Iqbal," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 39-66, August.
    3. Andreea Cosnita-Langlais & Jean-Philippe Tropeano, 2018. "How procedures shape substance: institutional design and antitrust evidentiary standards," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 143-164, August.

  6. Christopher Cotton & Brent R. Hickman & Joseph P. Price, 2014. "Affirmative Action and Human Capital Investment: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 20397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Fernanda Estevan & Thomas Gall, Louis-Philippe Morin, 2016. "Redistribution without distortion: Evidence from an affirmative action program at a large Brazilian university," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2016_07, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP), revised 14 Apr 2016.
    2. Fernando Botelho & Ricardo Madeira, Marcos A. Rangel, 2015. "Racial Discrimination in Grading: Evidence from Brazil," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2015_04, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    3. Peter Arcidiacono & Michael Lovenheim, 2016. "Affirmative Action and the Quality-Fit Trade-Off," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(1), pages 3-51, March.

  7. Luca Corazzini & Christopher Cotton & Paola Valbonesi, 2013. "Too many charities? Insight from an experiment with multiple public goods and contribution thresholds," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0171, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".

    Cited by:

    1. Kohei Nitta, 2014. "The Effect of Income Heterogeneity in An Experiment with Global and Local Public Goods," Working Papers 201403, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    2. James Andreoni & Laura Gee, 2015. "Gunning for efficiency with third party enforcement in threshold public goods," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 18(1), pages 154-171, March.
    3. Marianna Baggio & Luigi Mittone, 2015. "Grandparents Matter: Perspectives on Intergenerational Altruism. An Experiment on Family Dynamic Spillovers in Public Goods Games," CEEL Working Papers 1502, Cognitive and Experimental Economics Laboratory, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.

  8. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Competing for the Attention of Policymakers," Working Papers 2013-14, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Gregor, 2011. "Corporate lobbying: A review of the recent literature," Working Papers IES 2011/32, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Nov 2011.

  9. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2012. "Profiling, Screening and Criminal Recruitment," Working Papers 2013-02, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Bjørnskov, Christian, 2015. "Does economic freedom really kill? On the association between ‘Neoliberal’ policies and homicide rates," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 207-219.

  10. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2012. "Information and Extremism in Elections," Working Papers 2013-04, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Archishman Chakraborty & Parikshit Ghosh, 2016. "Character Endorsements and Electoral Competition," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 277-310, May.
    2. Alonso, Ricardo & Câmara, Odilon, 2016. "Political disagreement and information in elections," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 390-412.
    3. Câmara, Odilon & Bernhardt, Dan, 2015. "Learning about challengers," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 181-206.
    4. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2016. "Clueless Politicians," Working Papers 1341, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    5. Motz, Nicolas, 2012. "Who emerges from smoke-filled rooms? Political parties and candidate selection," MPRA Paper 44462, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2013.
    6. Marina Dodlova & Galina Zudenkova, 2016. "Incumbents' Performance and Political Polarization," CESifo Working Paper Series 5728, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Shadmehr, Mehdi, 2015. "Extremism in revolutionary movements," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 97-121.

  11. Christopher Cotton & Arnaud Dellis, 2012. "Informational Lobbying and Agenda Distortion," Working Papers 2013-03, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Yann Bramoullé & Caroline Orset, 2015. "Manufacturing Doubt," AMSE Working Papers 1547, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised Nov 2015.
    2. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Limited Capacity in Project Selection: Competition Through Evidence Production," Working Papers 1343, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    3. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Competing for the Attention of Policymakers," Working Papers 2013-14, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    4. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2016. "Clueless Politicians," Working Papers 1341, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    5. Cotton, Christopher, 2015. "Competing for Attention," MPRA Paper 65715, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Arnaud Dellis & Mandar Oak, 2017. "Subpoena Power and Information Transmission," School of Economics Working Papers 2017-05, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    7. Arnaud Dellis & Mandar Oak, 2016. "Overlobbying and Pareto-improving Agenda Constraint," School of Economics Working Papers 2016-05, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.

  12. Ralph Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2011. "Learning More by Doing Less," Working Papers 2011-6, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Barbos, Andrei, 2013. "Project screening with tiered evaluation," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 293-306.
    2. Andrei Barbos, 2014. "Imperfect evaluation in project screening," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 112(1), pages 31-46, May.

  13. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2010. "The Gender Gap Cracks Under Pressure: A Detailed Look at Male and Female Performance Differences During Competitions," NBER Working Papers 16436, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Attali, Yigal & Neeman, Zvika & Schlosser, Analia, 2011. "Rise to the Challenge or Not Give a Damn: Differential Performance in High vs. Low Stakes Tests," IZA Discussion Papers 5693, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2010. "Causes of Gender Differences in Competition: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 2010-19, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    3. Doris, Aedín & O’Neill, Donal & Sweetman, Olive, 2013. "Gender, single-sex schooling and maths achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 104-119.

  14. Christopher Cotton, 2010. "Pay-to-Play Politics: Informational lobbying and campaign finance reform when contributions buy access," Working Papers 2010-22, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Cotton & Arnaud Dellis, 2012. "Informational Lobbying and Agenda Distortion," Working Papers 2013-03, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    2. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Limited Capacity in Project Selection: Competition Through Evidence Production," Working Papers 1343, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    3. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Competing for the Attention of Policymakers," Working Papers 2013-14, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    4. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2016. "Clueless Politicians," Working Papers 1341, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    5. Cotton, Christopher, 2015. "Competing for Attention," MPRA Paper 65715, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Arnaud Dellis & Mandar Oak, 2016. "Overlobbying and Pareto-improving Agenda Constraint," School of Economics Working Papers 2016-05, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.

  15. Christopher Cotton, 2010. "Dynamic Legislative Bargaining with Endogenous Agenda Setting Authority," Working Papers 2010-20, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Dahm & Amihai Glazer, 2012. "How An Agenda Setter Induces Legislators to Adopt Policies They Oppose," Working Papers 111211, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    2. Dahm, Matthias & Glazer, Amihai, 2010. "Repeated Agenda Setting and the Unanimous Approval of Bad Policies," Working Papers 2072/151549, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    3. Jon X. Eguia & Kenneth A. Shepsle, 2014. "Endogenous Assembly Rules, Senior Agenda Power, and Incumbency Advantage," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 14/638, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    4. Matthias Dahm & Amihai Glazer, 2013. "A Carrot and Stick Approach to Agenda-Setting," Discussion Papers 2013-10, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    5. Eguia, Jon X. & Shepsle, Kenneth A., 2016. "Legislative Bargaining with Endogenous Rules," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 281, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).

  16. Christopher Cotton & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2009. "Gender Differences Disappear with Exposure to Competition," Working Papers 2010-11, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Cárdenas, Juan-Camilo & Dreber, Anna & von Essen, Emma & Ranehill, Eva, 2012. "Gender differences in competitiveness and risk taking: Comparing children in Colombia and Sweden," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 11-23.
    2. Migheli, Matteo, 2010. "Gender at work: Productivity and incentives," POLIS Working Papers 142, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
    3. Christiane Schwieren & Doris Weichselbaumer, 2008. "Does competition enhance performance or cheating? A laboratory experiment," NRN working papers 2008-05, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    4. Migheli, Matteo, 2015. "Gender at work: Incentives and self-sorting," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 10-18.
    5. Dreber, Anna & von Essen, Emma & Ranehill, Eva, 2009. "Outrunning the Gender Gap – Boys and Girls Compete Equally," SIFR Research Report Series 69, Institute for Financial Research.
    6. Dreber, Anna & von Essen, Emma & Ranehill, Eva, 2011. "Gender and Competition in Adolescence: Task Matter," Research Papers in Economics 2011:14, Stockholm University, Department of Economics, revised 08 Mar 2013.
    7. Bernd Frick & Friedrich Scheel, 2013. "Gender differences in competitiveness: empirical evidence from 100m races," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports, chapter 14, pages 293-318 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Dreber, Anna & von Essen, Emma & Ranehill, Eva, 2011. "In Bloom: Gender Differences in Preferences among Adolescents," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 734, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 12 Jul 2012.

  17. Christopher Cotton, 2009. "Sniping to Avoid the Endowment E ect in Auctions," Working Papers 2010-13, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Backus & Thomas Blake & Dimitriy V. Masterov & Steven Tadelis, 2017. "Expectation, Disappointment, and Exit: Reference Point Formation in a Marketplace," NBER Working Papers 23022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Carpenter, Jeffrey & Holmes, Jessica & Matthews, Peter Hans, 2011. "Jumping and sniping at the silents: Does it matter for charities?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(5-6), pages 395-402, June.

  18. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "Should We Tax or Cap Political Contributions? A Lobbying Model with Policy Favors and Access," Working Papers 0901, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Groll, Thomas & Ellis, Christopher J., 2012. "A Simple Model of the Commercial Lobbying Industry," MPRA Paper 36168, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Christopher Cotton & Arnaud Dellis, 2012. "Informational Lobbying and Agenda Distortion," Working Papers 2013-03, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    3. Martin Gregor, 2016. "Tullock's Puzzle in Pay-and-Play Lobbying," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 368-389, November.
    4. Christopher Cotton, 2010. "Evidence Revelation in Competitions for Access," Working Papers 2010-21, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    5. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Limited Capacity in Project Selection: Competition Through Evidence Production," Working Papers 1343, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    6. Aniol Llorente-Saguer & Roman M. Sheremeta & Nora Szech, 2016. "Designing Contests Between Heterogeneous Contestants: An Experimental Study of Tie-Breaks and Bid-Caps in All-Pay Auctions," CESifo Working Paper Series 5955, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Gregor Martin, 2015. "To Invite or Not to Invite a Lobby, That Is the Question," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 143-166, July.
    8. Jan Brueckner & Kangoh Lee, 2015. "Negative campaigning in a probabilistic voting model," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 164(3), pages 379-399, September.
    9. Francisco Candel-Sánchez & Juan Perote-Peña, 2018. "Endogenous market regulation in a signaling model of lobby formation," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 23-47, January.
    10. Cotton, Christopher, 2012. "Pay-to-play politics: Informational lobbying and contribution limits when money buys access," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(3), pages 369-386.
    11. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Competing for the Attention of Policymakers," Working Papers 2013-14, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    12. Jeffrey R. Brown & Jiekun Huang, 2017. "All the President’s Friends: Political Access and Firm Value," NBER Working Papers 23356, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Thomas Groll & Christopher J. Ellis, 2017. "Repeated Lobbying By Commercial Lobbyists And Special Interests," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1868-1897, October.
    14. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2016. "Clueless Politicians," Working Papers 1341, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    15. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2011. "Learning more by doing less," Working Papers 2012-1, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    16. Tatyana Chesnokova, 2010. "Lobby Interaction and Trade Policy," School of Economics Working Papers 2010-04, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    17. Cotton, Christopher, 2015. "Competing for Attention," MPRA Paper 65715, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Christopher Cotton, 2010. "Pay-to-Play Politics: Informational lobbying and campaign finance reform when contributions buy access," Working Papers 2010-22, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    19. Petrova, Maria & Sen, Ananya & Yildirim, Pinar, 2017. "Social Media and Political Donations: New Technology and Incumbency Advantage in the United States," CEPR Discussion Papers 11808, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    20. Thomas Groll & Anja Prummer, 2016. "Whom to Lobby? Targeting in Political Networks," Working Papers 808, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    21. Christopher Cotton, 2009. "Competition for Access and Full Revelation of Evidence," Working Papers 2010-12, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    22. Martin Gregor, 2014. "Receiver's access fee for a single sender," Working Papers IES 2014/17, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised May 2014.
    23. Martin Gregor, 2014. "Access fees for competing lobbies," Working Papers IES 2014/22, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jul 2014.
    24. Martin Gregor, 2011. "Corporate lobbying: A review of the recent literature," Working Papers IES 2011/32, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Nov 2011.
    25. Tarhan, Simge, 2010. "Campaign Contributions and Political Polarization," MPRA Paper 29617, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Mar 2011.
    26. Arnaud Dellis & Mandar Oak, 2017. "Subpoena Power and Information Transmission," School of Economics Working Papers 2017-05, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    27. Arnaud Dellis & Mandar Oak, 2016. "Overlobbying and Pareto-improving Agenda Constraint," School of Economics Working Papers 2016-05, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.

  19. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "Access Fees in Politics," Working Papers 0903, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "Should We Tax or Cap Political Contributions? A Lobbying Model with Policy Favors and Access," Working Papers 0901, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    2. Peter Grajzl, 2011. "A property rights approach to legislative delegation," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 177-200, June.

  20. Cotton, Christopher, 2007. "Informational Lobbying and Competition for Access," MPRA Paper 1842, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Cotton, 2008. "Access Fees in Politics," Working Papers 0903, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

  21. Cotton, Christopher, 2007. "Multiple-bidding in auctions as bidders become confident of their private valuations," MPRA Paper 1844, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Grebe, Tim & Ivanova-Stenzel, Radosveta & Kröger, Sabine, 2010. "Buy-It-Now prices in eBay Auctions - The Field in the Lab," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 294, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    2. Christopher Cotton, 2009. "Sniping to Avoid the Endowment E ect in Auctions," Working Papers 2010-13, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    3. Wenchuan Liu & Yu Zhang & Qi Li, 2015. "A semiparametric varying coefficient model of monotone auction bidding processes," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 313-335, February.

  22. Cotton, Christopher & Price, Joseph, 2006. "The Hot Hand, Competitive Experience, and Performance Differences by Gender," MPRA Paper 1843, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Livingston, Jeffrey A., 2012. "The hot hand and the cold hand in professional golf," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 172-184.
    2. Devin G. Pope & Maurice E. Schweitzer, 2011. "Is Tiger Woods Loss Averse? Persistent Bias in the Face of Experience, Competition, and High Stakes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 129-157, February.
    3. Keith F. Gilsdorf & Vasant A. Sukhatme, 2013. "Gender differences in responses to incentives in sports: some new results from golf," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports, chapter 5, pages 92-114 Edward Elgar Publishing.

Articles

  1. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2018. "Limited capacity in project selection: competition through evidence production," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 65(2), pages 385-421, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Christopher Cotton, 2016. "Competing for Attention: Lobbying Time-Constrained Politicians," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 18(4), pages 642-665, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Limited Capacity in Project Selection: Competition Through Evidence Production," Working Papers 1343, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    2. Thomas Groll & Christopher J. Ellis, 2017. "Repeated Lobbying By Commercial Lobbyists And Special Interests," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1868-1897, October.

  3. Christopher S. Cotton & Arnaud Déllis, 2016. "Informational Lobbying and Agenda Distortion," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(4), pages 762-793.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Grading Standards and Education Quality," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 248-279, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Raphael Boleslavsky & Bruce I. Carlin & Christopher Cotton, 2017. "Competing for Capital: Auditing and Credibility in Financial Reporting," NBER Working Papers 23273, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lehr Brandon, 2016. "Information and Inflation: An Analysis of Grading Behavior," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 755-783, April.
    3. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Limited Capacity in Project Selection: Competition Through Evidence Production," Working Papers 1343, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    4. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2016. "Clueless Politicians," Working Papers 1341, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    5. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton & Haresh Gurnani, 2015. "Demonstrations and Price Competition in New Product Release," Working Papers 1347, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

  5. S. Cotton, Christopher & Li, Cheng & McIntyre, Frank & P. Price, Joseph, 2015. "Which explanations for gender differences in competition are consistent with a simple theoretical model?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 56-67.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Corazzini, Luca & Cotton, Christopher & Valbonesi, Paola, 2015. "Donor coordination in project funding: Evidence from a threshold public goods experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 16-29.

    Cited by:

    1. Erik Ansink & Mark Koetse & Jetske Bouma & Dominic Hauck & Daan van Soest, 2017. "Crowdfunding public goods: An experiment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-119/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Claudia Niemeyer & Timm Teubner & Margeret Hall & Christof Weinhardt, 2018. "The Impact of Dynamic Feedback and Personal Budgets on Arousal and Funding Behaviour in Participatory Budgeting," Group Decision and Negotiation, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 611-636, August.
    3. Meer, Jonathan, 2017. "Does fundraising create new giving?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 82-93.
    4. Bose, Bijetri & Rabotyagov, Sergey, 2018. "Provision of public goods using a combination of lottery and a provision point," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 99-115.

  7. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li, 2015. "Profiling, Screening, and Criminal Recruitment," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(6), pages 964-985, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Raphael Boleslavsky & Christopher Cotton, 2015. "Information and Extremism in Elections," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 165-207, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  9. Campos, Sergio J. & Cotton, Christopher S. & Li, Cheng, 2015. "Deterrence effects under Twombly: On the costs of increasing pleading standards in litigation," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 61-71.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  10. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Submission Fees and Response Times in Academic Publishing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(1), pages 501-509, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Barbos, Andrei, 2013. "Project screening with tiered evaluation," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 293-306.
    2. Andrei Barbos, 2014. "Imperfect evaluation in project screening," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 112(1), pages 31-46, May.
    3. Martin Grančay & Jolita Vveinhardt & Ērika Šumilo, 2017. "Publish or perish: how Central and Eastern European economists have dealt with the ever-increasing academic publishing requirements 2000–2015," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 111(3), pages 1813-1837, June.
    4. Christopher Cotton, 2013. "Competing for the Attention of Policymakers," Working Papers 2013-14, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    5. Yuqing Zheng & Harry M. Kaiser, 2016. "Submission Demand In Core Economics Journals: A Panel Study," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 1319-1338, April.
    6. Baghestanian, Sascha & Popov, Sergey, 2014. "On Publication, Refereeing and Working Hard," MPRA Paper 58539, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Azar Ofer H., 2015. "A Model of the Academic Review Process with Informed Authors," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 865-889, April.
    8. Cotton, Christopher, 2015. "Competing for Attention," MPRA Paper 65715, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  11. Cotton, Christopher & McIntyre, Frank & Price, Joseph, 2013. "Gender differences in repeated competition: Evidence from school math contests," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 52-66.

    Cited by:

    1. Galliera, Arianna, 2018. "Self-selecting random or cumulative pay? A bargaining experiment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 106-120.
    2. Shulamit Kahn & Donna Ginther, 2017. "Women and STEM," NBER Working Papers 23525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Christopher Cotton & Cheng Li & Frank McIntyre & Joseph Price, 2015. "Which explanations for gender differences in competition are consistent with a simple theoretical model?," Working Papers 1342, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    4. Dato, Simon & Nieken, Petra, 2014. "Gender differences in competition and sabotage," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 64-80.
    5. David Masclet & Emmanuel Peterle & Sophie Larribeau, 2015. "Gender differences in tournament and flat-wage schemes: An experimental study," Post-Print halshs-01105414, HAL.
    6. Irene van Staveren, 2014. "The Lehman Sisters hypothesis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(5), pages 995-1014.
    7. Mohan, Nancy, 2014. "A review of the gender effect on pay, corporate performance and entry into top management," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 41-51.
    8. Maria De Paola & Francesca Gioia & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2013. "Are Females Scared of Competing with Males? Results from a Field Experiment," Framed Field Experiments 00396, The Field Experiments Website.
    9. Maria De Paola & Michela Ponzo & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2015. "Gender Differences In Attitudes Towards Competition: Evidence From The Italian Scientific Qualification," Working Papers 201505, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    10. Muriel Niederle, 2014. "Gender," NBER Working Papers 20788, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Christopher Cotton & Brent R. Hickman & Joseph P. Price, 2014. "Affirmative Action and Human Capital Investment: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 20397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. John, June, 2017. "Gender differences and the effect of facing harder competition," MPRA Paper 81072, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Jetter, Michael & Walker, Jay K., 2016. "Gender in Jeopardy!: The Role of Opponent Gender in High-Stakes Competition," IZA Discussion Papers 9669, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Birk, Erica G. & Lee, Logan M. & Waddell, Glen R., 2016. "Do Men Matter to Female Competition Even When They Don't?," IZA Discussion Papers 10184, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. John, June Park, 2017. "Gender differences and the effect of facing harder competition," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 201-222.
    16. Christopher Cotton & Brent R. Hickman & Joseph P. Price, 2016. "Affirmative Action and Human Capital Investment: Theory and Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," Working Papers 1350, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

  12. Cotton, Christopher, 2012. "Pay-to-play politics: Informational lobbying and contribution limits when money buys access," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(3), pages 369-386.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Avis & Claudio Ferraz & Frederico Finan & Carlos Varjão, "undated". "Money and Politics: The Effects of Campaign Spending Limits on Political Competition and Incumbency Advantage," Textos para discussão 656, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    2. Martin Gregor, 2016. "Tullock's Puzzle in Pay-and-Play Lobbying," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 368-389, November.
    3. Gregor Martin, 2015. "To Invite or Not to Invite a Lobby, That Is the Question," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 143-166, July.
    4. Schneider, Maik T., 2014. "Interest-group size and legislative lobbying," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 29-41.
    5. Marco Battaglini & Eleonora Patacchini, 2016. "Influencing Connected Legislators," NBER Working Papers 22739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Thomas Groll & Christopher J. Ellis, 2017. "Repeated Lobbying By Commercial Lobbyists And Special Interests," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1868-1897, October.
    7. Petrova, Maria & Sen, Ananya & Yildirim, Pinar, 2017. "Social Media and Political Donations: New Technology and Incumbency Advantage in the United States," CEPR Discussion Papers 11808, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Zudenkova Galina, 2017. "Lobbying as a Guard against Extremism," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 1-17, February.
    9. Martin Gregor, 2014. "Receiver's access fee for a single sender," Working Papers IES 2014/17, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised May 2014.
    10. Martin Gregor, 2014. "Access fees for competing lobbies," Working Papers IES 2014/22, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jul 2014.
    11. Wolton, Stephane, 2016. "Lobbying, Inside and Out: How Special Interest Groups Influence Policy Choices," MPRA Paper 68637, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Boleslavsky, Raphael & Lewis, Tracy R., 2016. "Evolving influence: Mitigating extreme conflicts of interest in advisory relationships," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 110-134.

  13. Cotton, Christopher, 2009. "Multiple bidding in auctions as bidders become confident of their private valuations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 148-150, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  14. Cotton, Christopher, 2009. "Should we tax or cap political contributions? A lobbying model with policy favors and access," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(7-8), pages 831-842, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Rankings

This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
  1. Record of graduates

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 30 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (8) 2009-04-05 2009-11-27 2012-05-22 2013-09-06 2014-09-05 2015-07-25 2015-09-18 2017-01-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (7) 2007-02-24 2009-04-05 2009-04-05 2013-02-03 2013-02-03 2015-07-25 2015-07-25. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (5) 2009-04-05 2009-11-27 2011-09-16 2012-05-29 2013-02-03. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (5) 2011-09-16 2013-02-03 2013-02-03 2015-07-25 2015-08-30. Author is listed
  5. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (4) 2007-02-24 2009-04-05 2009-04-05 2017-01-08
  6. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (4) 2007-02-24 2012-05-22 2015-07-18 2017-01-08
  7. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2009-11-27 2012-05-29 2014-09-05 2015-09-18
  8. NEP-EDU: Education (3) 2012-05-29 2014-09-05 2015-09-18
  9. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (3) 2009-04-05 2012-05-22 2013-09-06
  10. NEP-ACC: Accounting & Auditing (2) 2017-01-29 2017-05-07
  11. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (2) 2012-05-22 2013-09-06
  12. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (2) 2015-07-18 2015-08-25
  13. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2014-09-05 2015-07-25
  14. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2015-08-13
  15. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2015-08-13
  16. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2015-08-13
  17. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2012-05-22
  18. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2015-08-30
  19. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2015-07-25
  20. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2015-08-13
  21. NEP-MKT: Marketing (1) 2015-08-13
  22. NEP-NPS: Nonprofit & Public Sector (1) 2013-09-06
  23. NEP-PPM: Project, Program & Portfolio Management (1) 2015-07-25
  24. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2013-09-06
  25. NEP-SPO: Sports & Economics (1) 2009-11-27

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