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Anna Bindler

Personal Details

First Name:Anna
Middle Name:
Last Name:Bindler
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbi338
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/annabindler/

Affiliation

Nationalekonomiska institutionen
Handelshögskolan
Göteborgs Universitet

Göteborg, Sweden
http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/

: 031-773 10 00

Vasagatan 1, Box 640, 405 30 Göteborg
RePEc:edi:naiguse (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bindler, Anna & Ketel, Nadine, 2019. "Scaring or scarring? Labour market effects of criminal victimisation," CEPR Discussion Papers 13431, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2018. "Path Dependency in Jury Decision-Making," CEPR Discussion Papers 13012, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2016. "The Fall of Capital Punishment and the Rise of Prisons: How Punishment Severity Affects Jury Verdicts," Working Papers in Economics 674, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  4. Bindler, Anna, 2016. "Still unemployed, what next? Crime and unemployment duration," Working Papers in Economics 660, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  5. Brian Bell & Anna Bindler & Stephen Machin, 2015. "Crime scars: can recessions produce career criminals?," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 451, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Bell, Brian & Bindler, Anna & Machin, Stephen, 2014. "Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals," IZA Discussion Papers 8332, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Brian Bell & Anna Bindler & Stephen Machin, 2018. "Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 392-404, July.
  2. Anna Bindler & Randi Hjalmarsson, 2018. "How Punishment Severity Affects Jury Verdicts: Evidence from Two Natural Experiments," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 36-78, November.
  3. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2017. "Prisons, recidivism and the age–crime profile," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 46-49.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2016. "The Fall of Capital Punishment and the Rise of Prisons: How Punishment Severity Affects Jury Verdicts," Working Papers in Economics 674, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Off with his head? Capital punishment and jurors’ dilemmas in 19th and 20th century Britain
      by crowleymarkj in NEP-HIS blog on 2016-11-03 17:08:42

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Brian Bell & Anna Bindler & Stephen Machin, 2018. "Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 392-404, July.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals (REStat 2018) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2016. "The Fall of Capital Punishment and the Rise of Prisons: How Punishment Severity Affects Jury Verdicts," Working Papers in Economics 674, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Rosario Crino & Giovanni Immordino & Gülen Karakoç-Palminteri & Salvatore Piccolo, 2017. "Marginal Deterrence at Work," CSEF Working Papers 478, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    2. Bernardo Guimaraes & Bruno Meyerhof Salama, 2017. "Contingent Judicial Deference: theory and application to usury laws," Discussion Papers 1729, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
    3. Guimaraesy, Bernardo & Meyerhof Salama, Bruno, 2017. "Contingent judicial deference: theory and application to usury laws," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86146, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  2. Bindler, Anna, 2016. "Still unemployed, what next? Crime and unemployment duration," Working Papers in Economics 660, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Deiana, C, 2016. "Local Labour Market Effects of Unemployment on Crime Induced by Trade Shocks," Economics Discussion Papers 16529, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    2. Bennett, Patrick & Ouazad, Amine, 2018. "Job Displacement, Unemployment, and Crime: Evidence from Danish Microdata and Reforms," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 32/2018, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics, revised 21 Dec 2018.

  3. Bell, Brian & Bindler, Anna & Machin, Stephen, 2014. "Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals," IZA Discussion Papers 8332, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Bell, Brian & Costa, Rui & Machin, Stephen, 2018. "Why Does Education Reduce Crime?," CEPR Discussion Papers 13162, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Bell, Brian & Costa, Rui & Machin, Stephen, 2015. "Crime, compulsory schooling laws and education," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64968, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Couttenier, Mathieu & Preotu, Veronica & Rohner, Dominic & Thoenig, Mathias, 2016. "The Violent Legacy of Victimization: Post-Conflict Evidence on Asylum Seekers, Crimes and Public Policy in Switzerland," CEPR Discussion Papers 11079, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Lastauskas, Povilas & Tatsi, Eirini, 2017. "Spatial Nexus in Crime and Unemployment in Times of Crisis," Working Paper Series 2/2017, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    5. Maria Micaela Sviatschi, 2018. "Making a Narco: Childhood Exposure to Illegal Labor Markets and Criminal Life Paths," Working Papers 2018-03, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
    6. Draca, Mirko & Koutmeridis, Theodore & Machin, Steve, 2015. "The Changing Returns to Crime: Do Criminals Respond to Prices?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10647, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Schnepel, Kevin, 2014. "Good Jobs and Recidivism," Working Papers 2014-10, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    8. Marco Caliendo & Ricarda Schmidl, 2016. "Youth unemployment and active labor market policies in Europe," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-30, December.
    9. Sebastian Galiani & Laura Jaitman & Federico Weinschelbaum, 2018. "Crime and Durable Goods," Documentos de Trabajo LACEA 016419, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA.
    10. Costa, Rui & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "Crime, compulsory schooling laws and educationAuthor-Name: Bell, Brian," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 214-226.
    11. Deiana, C, 2016. "Local Labour Market Effects of Unemployment on Crime Induced by Trade Shocks," Economics Discussion Papers 16529, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    12. Bennett, Patrick & Ouazad, Amine, 2018. "Job Displacement, Unemployment, and Crime: Evidence from Danish Microdata and Reforms," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 32/2018, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics, revised 21 Dec 2018.
    13. Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 2018. "Entry Through the Narrow Door: The Costs of Just Failing High Stakes Exams," Working Papers 2018-029, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    14. Siwach, Garima, 2018. "Unemployment shocks for individuals on the margin: Exploring recidivism effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 231-244.
    15. Echazu, Luciana & Nocetti, Diego, 2019. "Understanding risky behaviors during adolescence: A model of self-discovery through experimentation," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 12-21.
    16. Torben Tranaes, 2015. "Active labor market policies and crime," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 185-185, September.
    17. Bindler, Anna, 2016. "Still unemployed, what next? Crime and unemployment duration," Working Papers in Economics 660, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    18. Fallesen, Peter & Geerdsen, Lars Pico & Imai, Susumu & Tranæs, Torben, 2018. "The effect of active labor market policies on crime: Incapacitation and program effects," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 263-286.
    19. Jonathan Cribb & Andrew Hood & Robert Joyce, 2017. "Entering the labour market in a weak economy: scarring and insurance," IFS Working Papers W17/27, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Articles

  1. Brian Bell & Anna Bindler & Stephen Machin, 2018. "Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 392-404, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Anna Bindler & Randi Hjalmarsson, 2018. "How Punishment Severity Affects Jury Verdicts: Evidence from Two Natural Experiments," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 36-78, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2018. "Path Dependency in Jury Decision-Making," CEPR Discussion Papers 13012, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  3. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2017. "Prisons, recidivism and the age–crime profile," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 46-49.

    Cited by:

    1. Bell, Brian & Costa, Rui & Machin, Stephen, 2018. "Why Does Education Reduce Crime?," CEPR Discussion Papers 13162, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2016. "The Fall of Capital Punishment and the Rise of Prisons: How Punishment Severity Affects Jury Verdicts," Working Papers in Economics 674, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    3. Sofia Amaral & Sonia Bhalotra & Nishith Prakash, 2019. "Gender, Crime and Punishment: Evidence from Women Police Stations in India," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-309, Boston University - Department of Economics.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 13 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (12) 2014-07-21 2014-07-28 2015-02-11 2015-09-05 2016-03-06 2016-06-18 2016-10-16 2017-03-12 2018-09-03 2019-01-21 2019-02-11 2019-02-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (5) 2016-06-18 2018-09-03 2019-01-21 2019-02-11 2019-02-25. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (4) 2016-06-18 2019-01-21 2019-02-11 2019-02-25. Author is listed
  4. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (3) 2014-07-21 2014-07-28 2015-02-11
  5. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (3) 2016-10-16 2017-03-12 2018-07-16
  6. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2018-07-16
  7. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2014-07-21

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