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Common Factors of Commodity Prices

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  • S. Delle Chiaie
  • L. Ferrara
  • D. Giannone

Abstract

In this paper we extract latent factors from a large cross-section of commodity prices, including fuel and non-fuel commodities. We decompose each commodity price series into a global (or common) component, block-specific components and a purely idiosyncratic shock. We find that the bulk of the fluctuations in commodity prices is well summarised by a single global factor. This global factor is closely related to fluctuations in global economic activity and its importance in explaining commodity price variations has increased since the 2000s, especially for oil prices.

Suggested Citation

  • S. Delle Chiaie & L. Ferrara & D. Giannone, 2017. "Common Factors of Commodity Prices," Working papers 645, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:645
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    Cited by:

    1. Fernández, Andrés & González, Andrés & Rodríguez, Diego, 2018. "Sharing a ride on the commodities roller coaster: Common factors in business cycles of emerging economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 99-121.
    2. Dario Caldara & Michele Cavallo & Matteo Iacoviello, 2016. "Oil Price Elasticities and Oil Price Fluctuations," International Finance Discussion Papers 1173, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Lutz Kilian & Xiaoqing Zhou, 2017. "Modeling Fluctuations in the Global Demand for Commodities," CESifo Working Paper Series 6749, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Commodity prices; Dynamic factor models; Forecasting.;

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • Q02 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Commodity Market

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