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Nzinga Harriet Broussard

Personal Details

First Name:Nzinga
Middle Name:Harriet
Last Name:Broussard
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbr497
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree: Economics Department; University of Michigan (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC)
Government of the United States

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.mcc.gov/

: 202-521-3600

875 Fifteenth Street NW, Washington, DC 20005-2221
RePEc:edi:mccgvus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Broussard, Nzinga & Poppe, Robert & Tekleselassie, Tsegay, 2016. "The Impact of Emergency Food Aid on Children's Schooling and Work Decisions," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235219, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  2. Alem, Yonas & Broussard, Nzinga H., 2013. "Do Safety Nets Promote Technology Adoption? Panel data evidence from rural Ethiopia," Working Papers in Economics 556, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  3. Broussard, Nzinga H & Dercon, Stefan & Somanathan, Rohini, 2012. "Aid and Agency in Africa: Explaining Food Disbursements Across Ethiopian Households, 1994-2004," CEPR Discussion Papers 8861, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Nzinga Broussard & Ralph Chami & Gregory Hess, 2003. "(Why) Do Self-Employed Parents Have More Children?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1103, CESifo Group Munich.

Articles

  1. Nzinga H. Broussard, 2017. "Immigration and the Labor Market Outcomes of Natives in Developing Countries: A Case Study of South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(3), pages 389-424.
  2. Nzinga Broussard & Ralph Chami & Gregory Hess, 2015. "(Why) Do self-employed parents have more children?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 297-321, June.
  3. Broussard, Nzinga H. & Dercon, Stefan & Somanathan, Rohini, 2014. "Aid and agency in Africa: Explaining food disbursements across Ethiopian households, 1994–2004," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 128-137.
  4. Nzinga H. Broussard, 2012. "Food aid and adult nutrition in rural Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 45-59, January.
  5. Blomberg, S. Brock & Broussard, Nzinga H. & Hess, Gregory D., 2011. "New wine in old wineskins? Growth, terrorism and the resource curse in sub-Saharan Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(S1), pages 50-63.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Alem, Yonas & Broussard, Nzinga H., 2013. "Do Safety Nets Promote Technology Adoption? Panel data evidence from rural Ethiopia," Working Papers in Economics 556, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Sheahan, Megan & Barrett, Christopher B., 2014. "Understanding the agricultural input landscape in Sub-Saharan Africa : recent plot, household, and community-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7014, The World Bank.

  2. Broussard, Nzinga H & Dercon, Stefan & Somanathan, Rohini, 2012. "Aid and Agency in Africa: Explaining Food Disbursements Across Ethiopian Households, 1994-2004," CEPR Discussion Papers 8861, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Newman Carol & Zhang Mengyang, 2015. "Connections and the Allocation of Public Benefits," WIDER Working Paper Series 031, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Urquía-Grande, Elena & Rubio-Alcocer, Antonio, 2015. "Agricultural infrastructure donation performance: Empirical evidence in rural Ethiopia," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 245-254.
    3. Ferrière, Nathalie & Suwa-Eisenmann, Akiko, 2015. "Does Food Aid Disrupt Local Food Market? Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 114-131.
    4. Nathalie Ferrière & Akiko Suwa-Eisenmann, 2014. "Does food aid disrupt local food market? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," FOODSECURE Working papers 26, LEI Wageningen UR.
    5. Alem, Yonas & Broussard, Nzinga H., 2013. "Do Safety Nets Promote Technology Adoption? Panel data evidence from rural Ethiopia," Working Papers in Economics 556, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.

  3. Nzinga Broussard & Ralph Chami & Gregory Hess, 2003. "(Why) Do Self-Employed Parents Have More Children?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1103, CESifo Group Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Pernilla Andersson Joona, 2018. "How does motherhood affect self-employment performance?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 29-54, January.
    2. Rosa Aisa & Joaquín Andaluz & Gemma Larramona, 2017. "Fertility patterns in the Roma population of Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 115-133, March.
    3. Pernilla Andersson Joona, 2017. "Are mothers of young children more likely to be self-employed? The case of Sweden," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 307-333, March.
    4. Gustavo A. Caballero, 2017. "Responsibility or autonomy: children and the probability of self-employment in the USA," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 493-512, August.
    5. Christopher Jepsen & Lisa K. Jepsen, 2017. "Self-employment, earnings, and sexual orientation," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 287-305, March.
    6. Blanchflower, David G., 2007. "Entrepreneurship in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 3130, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2007. "What Makes a Young Entrepreneur?," IZA Discussion Papers 3139, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Florian Noseleit, 2014. "Female self-employment and children," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 549-569, October.
    9. Dongxu Wu & Zhongmin Wu, 2015. "Intergenerational links, gender differences, and determinants of self-employment," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(3), pages 400-414, August.
    10. LaLumia, Sara, 2009. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Reported Self-Employment Income," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 62(2), pages 191-217, June.
    11. Andersson Joona, Pernilla, 2014. "Female Self-Employment and Children: The Case of Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 8486, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Hessels, Jolanda & Rietveld, Cornelius A. & van der Zwan, Peter, 2017. "Self-employment and work-related stress: The mediating role of job control and job demand," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 178-196.
    13. David Blanchflower, 2009. "Minority self-employment in the United States and the impact of affirmative action programs," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 361-396, June.
    14. Blanchflower, David G. & Shadforth, Chris, 2007. "Entrepreneurship in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 2818, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Nzinga Broussard & Ralph Chami & Gregory Hess, 2015. "(Why) Do self-employed parents have more children?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 297-321, June.
    16. Amore, Mario Daniele & Miller, Danny & Le Breton-Miller, Isabelle & Corbetta, Guido, 2017. "For love and money: Marital leadership in family firms," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 461-476.

Articles

  1. Nzinga Broussard & Ralph Chami & Gregory Hess, 2015. "(Why) Do self-employed parents have more children?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 297-321, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Broussard, Nzinga H. & Dercon, Stefan & Somanathan, Rohini, 2014. "Aid and agency in Africa: Explaining food disbursements across Ethiopian households, 1994–2004," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 128-137.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Nzinga H. Broussard, 2012. "Food aid and adult nutrition in rural Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 45-59, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Lentz, Erin C. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2013. "The economics and nutritional impacts of food assistance policies and programs," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 151-163.
    2. Robert Poppe, 2014. "Poor Eyesight and Educational Outcomes in Ethiopia," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(2), pages 205-223, June.

  4. Blomberg, S. Brock & Broussard, Nzinga H. & Hess, Gregory D., 2011. "New wine in old wineskins? Growth, terrorism and the resource curse in sub-Saharan Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(S1), pages 50-63.

    Cited by:

    1. Andra Filote & Niklas Potrafke & Heinrich Ursprung, 2015. "Suicide Attacks and Religious Cleavages," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2015-01, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    2. Mohammadi, Teymour & Jahangard, Fateme & Khani Hoolari, Seyed Morteza, 2014. "The relationship between reserves of oil endowment and economic growth from the resource curse viewpoint: a case study of oil producing countries," MPRA Paper 56092, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gassebner, Martin & Egger, Peter, 2014. "International terrorism as a trade impediment?," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100279, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Khusrav Gaibulloev & Todd Sandler & Donggyu Sul, "undated". "Reevaluating Terrorism and Economic Growth: Dynamic Panel Analysis and Cross-Sectional Dependence," Economics Working Papers 02-03/2013, School of Business Administration, American University of Sharjah.
    5. Younas, Javed, 2015. "Terrorism, openness and the Feldstein–Horioka paradox," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1-11.
    6. Chuku Chuku & Isip Ima-Abasi & Abang Dominic, 2017. "Working Paper 284 - Growth and Fiscal Consequences of Terrorism in Nigeria," Working Paper Series 2410, African Development Bank.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (4) 2012-02-01 2012-03-28 2013-03-16 2016-06-14
  2. NEP-AFR: Africa (3) 2012-02-01 2012-03-28 2013-03-16
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (3) 2012-02-01 2012-03-28 2013-03-16
  4. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2016-06-14
  5. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2004-05-02
  6. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2004-05-02

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