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Suicide Attacks and Religious Cleavages

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  • Andra Filote
  • Niklas Potrafke

    ()

  • Heinrich Ursprung

Abstract

Many experts claim that the incidence of suicide attacks is driven by religious cleavages. To test this hypothesis, we investigate whether the total number of suicide attacks per violent conflict or the annual number of suicide attacks per country is associated with simmering religious conflicts. We distinguish between two kinds of religious cleavages: cleavages at the macro level between the stake holders in violent conflicts and cleavages at the micro or battle field level between the actual perpetrators and victims of suicide attacks. Our results do not indicate that religious cleavages are an important precondition for the incidence of suicide attacks.

Suggested Citation

  • Andra Filote & Niklas Potrafke & Heinrich Ursprung, 2015. "Suicide Attacks and Religious Cleavages," CESifo Working Paper Series 5179, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5179
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:kap:pubcho:v:173:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11127-017-0477-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kis-Katos, Krisztina & Liebert, Helge & Schulze, Günther G., 2014. "On the heterogeneity of terror," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 116-136.
    3. Arye Hillman & Niklas Potrafke, 2015. "The UN Goldstone Report and retraction: an empirical investigation," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 163(3), pages 247-266, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    suicide terrorism; religion; religious cleavages; club goods;

    JEL classification:

    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions

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