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On the origin of domestic and international terrorism

  • Kis-Katos, Krisztina
  • Liebert, Helge
  • Schulze, Günther G.

We analyze the determinants of the origin of domestic and international terrorism in a large panel data set of 159 countries spanning from 1970 to 2007. We show that terror increases with GDP per capita, a higher polity score measuring a more open and competitive political system and experiences of domestic conflict, anarchy and regime transitions. Our evidence thus contradicts the notion that terrorism is rooted in economic deprivation or that strongly autocratic regimes breed more terrorists. Rather we show that weak or failing states are an incubator for terrorism. We also show that the causes of domestic terror and international terror are similar.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176268011000231
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 27 (2011)
Issue (Month): S1 ()
Pages: S17-S36

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Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:27:y:2011:i:s1:p:s17-s36
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2011.02.002
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544

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