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The effects of government intervention on the market for corporate terrorism insurance

  • Michel-Kerjan, Erwann
  • Raschky, Paul A.

Nine OECD countries presently have national terrorism insurance programs based on some type of public–private risk sharing. While such arrangements have helped provide the necessary insurance capacity in the post-September 11, 2001 era, little is known about the effect of such governmental intervention on terrorism insurance markets. This paper focuses on the United States, where the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act of 2002 (TRIA) provides insurers with no cost federal reinsurance up to an industry-wide loss of $100billion. We present an empirical analysis to compare how insurers' diversification behavior varies between property coverage (no governmental intervention) and terrorism coverage (with government intervention). We find evidence that insurers in the U.S. are much less diversified for terrorism coverage than they are for property lines of coverage. We interpret these findings as tentative evidence for moral hazard caused by the governmental intervention under TRIA.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176268011000334
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 27 (2011)
Issue (Month): S1 ()
Pages: S122-S132

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Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:27:y:2011:i:s1:p:s122-s132
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2011.03.006
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544

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