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The (Hidden) Financial Flows of Terrorist and Organized Crime Organizations: A Literature Review and Some Preliminary Empirical Results

  • Schneider, Friedrich

    ()

    (University of Linz)

The financial means of international terror and organized crime organizations are analysed. First, some short remarks about the organization of international terror organizations are made. Second and in a much more detailed way a literature review is provided about the financing of terrorist and organized crime organizations, their sources and the various methods they use. Third, an attempt is made to estimate the financial means of terror organizations with the help of a latent estimation approach (MIMIC procedure). The figures show that Al Qaeda and other terror organizations have sufficient financial means. Fourth, some remarks are made about the negative effects of terror on the economy in highly developed countries and some strategies are presented to combat (the financing) of terrorism.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 4860.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4860
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  1. Freytag, Andreas & Krüger, Jens J. & Meierrieks, Daniel & Schneider, Friedrich, 2011. "The origins of terrorism: Cross-country estimates of socio-economic determinants of terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(S1), pages S5-S16.
  2. Brown, Jeffrey R. & Cummins, J. David & Lewis, Christopher M. & Wei, Ran, 2004. "An empirical analysis of the economic impact of federal terrorism reinsurance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 861-898, July.
  3. Alberto Abadie, 2006. "Poverty, Political Freedom, and the Roots of Terrorism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 50-56, May.
  4. Bruno S. Frey & Simon Luechinger & Alois Stutzer, 2004. "Calculating Tragedy: Assessing the Costs of Terrorism," CESifo Working Paper Series 1341, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Zdanowicz John S., 2009. "Trade-Based Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 855-878, December.
  6. Addison, Tony & Murshed, S. Mansoob, 2002. "Transnational Terrorism as a Spillover of Domestic Disputes in Other Countries," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. Konstantinos Drakos, 2009. "The Determinants of Terrorist Shocks' Cross-Market Transmission," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 17, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  8. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "The Economics of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism: A Survey (Part II)," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1050, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  9. Drakos, Konstantinos & Kutan, Ali M., 2001. "Regional effects of terrorism on tourism: Evidence from three Mediterranean countries," ZEI Working Papers B 26-2001, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
  10. Indridi H. Indridason, 2008. "Does Terrorism Influence Domestic Politics? Coalition Formation and Terrorist Incidents," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 45(2), pages 241-259, March.
  11. N/A, 2008. "The World Economy," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 204(1), pages 9-14, April.
  12. Konstantinos Drakos, 2009. "Cross-Country Stock Market Reactions to Major Terror Events: The Role of Risk Perception," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 16, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  13. N/A, 2008. "The World Economy," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 203(1), pages 8-30, January.
  14. Abadie, Alberto & Gardeazabal, Javier, 2008. "Terrorism and the world economy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 1-27, January.
  15. Sandler, Todd & Enders, Walter, 2004. "An economic perspective on transnational terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 301-316, June.
  16. Mohammed El Qorchi & Samuel Munzele Maimbo & John F. Wilson, 2003. "Informal Funds Transfer Systems; An Analysis of the Informal Hawala System," IMF Occasional Papers 222, International Monetary Fund.
  17. Friedrich Schneider & Ursula Windischbauer, 2010. "Money Laundering: Some Facts," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 25, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  18. Tilman Brück, 2004. "An Economic Analysis of Security Policies," HiCN Working Papers 06, Households in Conflict Network.
  19. Drakos, Konstantinos, 2004. "Terrorism-induced structural shifts in financial risk: airline stocks in the aftermath of the September 11th terror attacks," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 435-446, June.
  20. Walker John & Unger Brigitte, 2009. "Measuring Global Money Laundering: "The Walker Gravity Model"," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 821-853, December.
  21. Tavares, Jose, 2004. "The open society assesses its enemies: shocks, disasters and terrorist attacks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 1039-1070, July.
  22. S. Brock Blomberg & Gregory D. Hess & Athanasios Orphanides, 2004. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Terrorism," CESifo Working Paper Series 1151, CESifo Group Munich.
  23. Alan B. Krueger & Jitka Maleckova, 2003. "Education, Poverty and Terrorism: Is There a Causal Connection?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 119-144, Fall.
  24. Llussá, Fernanda & Tavares, José, 2007. "Economics and Terrorism: What We Know, What We Should Know and the Data We Need," CEPR Discussion Papers 6509, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  25. Chen, Andrew H. & Siems, Thomas F., 2004. "The effects of terrorism on global capital markets," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 349-366, June.
  26. Bagella Michele & Busato Francesco & Argentiero Amedeo, 2009. "Money Laundering in a Microfounded Dynamic Model: Simulations for the U.S. and the EU-15 Economies," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 879-902, December.
  27. Kaul, Inge & Conceicao, Pedro & Le Goulven, Katell & Mendoza, Ronald U. (ed.), 2003. "Providing Global Public Goods: Managing Globalization," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195157413.
  28. Elöd Takáts, 2007. "A Theory of “Crying Wolf†; The Economics of Money Laundering Enforcement," IMF Working Papers 07/81, International Monetary Fund.
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