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Poverty, political freedom, and the roots of terrorism in developing countries: An empirical assessment

  • Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu
  • Younas, Javed

We find that political freedom has a significant and non-linear effect on domestic terrorism, but has no statistically significant effect on transnational terrorism. Geography and fractionalization limit a country's ability to curb terrorism, while strong legal institutions deter terrorism.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 112 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (August)
Pages: 171-175

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:112:y:2011:i:2:p:171-175
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  18. Younas, Javed, 2008. "Motivation for bilateral aid allocation: Altruism or trade benefits," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 661-674, September.
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