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Transnational Terrorism as a Spillover of Domestic Disputes in Other Countries

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  • Addison, Tony
  • Murshed, S. Mansoob

Abstract

This paper models transnational terrorism as a three-way strategic interaction involving a government that faces armed opposition at home, which may spill over in the form of acts of terrorism by the state's opponents against the government's external sponsor. The external sponsor also utilises deterrence against potential terrorists, which only lowers terrorism if terrorists are not intrinsically motivated by a deep-seated sense of humiliation. The model highlights the importance of intrinsic motivation. A rise in the external power's preference for deterrence against terrorism may backfire in these circumstances. Increases in the government's military efficiency against the rebels, who are also terrorists against the government's sponsor, raises overall levels of violence.
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(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Addison, Tony & Murshed, S. Mansoob, 2002. "Transnational Terrorism as a Spillover of Domestic Disputes in Other Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 120, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:dp2002-120
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    File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/dp2002-120.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1995. "Anarchy and Its Breakdown," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(1), pages 26-52, February.
    2. Tony Addison & Philippe Le Billon & S. Mansoob Murshed, 2001. "Finance in conflict and reconstruction," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 951-964.
    3. Tony Addison & S. Mansoob Murshed, 2002. "Credibility and Reputation in Peacemaking," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 39(4), pages 487-501, July.
    4. Mario Ferrero, 2005. "Radicalization as a reaction to failure: An economic model of Islamic extremism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 199-220, January.
    5. Solomon W. Polachek, 2002. "Trade-Based Interactions: an Interdisciplinary Perspective," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 19(2), pages 1-21, September.
    6. Murshed, S Mansoob & Sen, Somnath, 1995. "Aid Conditionality and Military Expenditure Reduction in Developing Countries: Models of Asymmetric Information," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(429), pages 498-509, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sacit Hadi Akdede & Ayla Oğus, 2009. "Death As A Measure Of Duration Of Conflict," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(6), pages 465-476.
    2. Tim Krieger & Daniel Meierrieks, 2011. "What causes terrorism?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 3-27, April.
    3. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "The Economics of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism: A Survey (Part I)," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1049, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Dimant, Eugen & Krieger, Tim & Meierrieks, Daniel, 2017. "Negative returns: U.S. military policy and anti-american terrorism," Discussion Paper Series 2017-05, University of Freiburg, Wilfried Guth Endowed Chair for Constitutional Political Economy and Competition Policy.
    5. Jean-Paul Azam, 2005. "Suicide-bombing as inter-generational investment," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 177-198, January.
    6. Friedrich Schneider, 2009. "Die Finanzströme von organisierter Kriminalität und Terrorismus: was wissen wir (nicht)?," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 78(4), pages 73-87.
    7. Schneider, Friedrich, 2010. "The (Hidden) Financial Flows of Terrorist and Organized Crime Organizations: A Literature Review and Some Preliminary Empirical Results," IZA Discussion Papers 4860, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. S Mansoob Murshed & Sara Pavan, 2009. "Identity and Islamic Radicalization in Western Europe," Research Working Papers 16, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
    9. Tim Krieger & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "Terrorism in the Worlds of Welfare Capitalism," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 54(6), pages 902-939, December.
    10. Gustavo Canavire-Bacarreza & Alejandra Montoya-Agudelo & Felipe Bedoya-Maya, 2017. "Home Alone: Geographic Fragmentation as Determinant of Terrorism," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 015759, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
    11. Syed Mansoob Murshed, 2009. "Threat Perceptions in Europe: Domestic Terrorism and International Crime," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 2, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Murshed, S. Mansoob, 2006. "Indivisibility, Fairness, Farsightedness and their Implications for Security," WIDER Working Paper Series 028, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    conflict; terrorism; civil war;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government

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