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Perceptions and attitudes following a terrorist shock: Evidence from the UK

Listed author(s):
  • Bozzoli, Carlos
  • Müller, Cathérine

Transnational terrorism in Western countries has raised questions about security measures that constrain civil liberties. This is the first paper that uses a terrorist attack, that in the London 7/7/2005, as an exogenous source of variation to study the dynamics of risk perception and the effect on the readiness to trade off civil liberties for enhanced security. In this framework we show that willingness to trade off security for liberties is dramatically affected by changes in individual risk assessments due to a terrorist attack. We document the extent of persistence of changed attitudes.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176268011000681
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 27 (2011)
Issue (Month): S1 ()
Pages: 89-106

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Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:27:y:2011:i:s1:p:s89-s106
DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2011.06.005
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544

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