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Judged Terror Risk and Proximity to the World Trade Center

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  • Fischhoff, Baruch
  • Gonzalez, Roxana M.
  • Small, Deborah A.
  • Lerner, Jennifer S.

Abstract

In November 2001, a nationally representative sample of Americans (N = 973, ages 13-88), queried via WebTVs at home, judged the probability of five terror-related events (e.g., being injured in an attack) and three "routine" risks (e.g., being a victim of other violent crime), in the following 12 months. Judgments of terror risks, but not routine risks, were related to whether respondents were within 100 mi of the World Trade Center. This relationship was found only in the following demographic groups, and not their complements: men, adults, whites, and Republicans. These differential responses to risk have both theoretical and policy implications. Copyright 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Fischhoff, Baruch & Gonzalez, Roxana M. & Small, Deborah A. & Lerner, Jennifer S., 2003. "Judged Terror Risk and Proximity to the World Trade Center," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 26(2-3), pages 137-151, March-May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:26:y:2003:i:2-3:p:137-51
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Claes H. De Vreese & Anna Kandyla, 2009. "News Framing and Public Support for a Common Foreign and Security Policy," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47, pages 453-481, June.
    2. Shosh Shahrabani & Uri Benzion & Mosi Rosenboim & Tal Shavit, 2012. "Does moving from war zone change emotions and risk perceptions? A field study of Israeli students," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 7(5), pages 669-678, September.
    3. Latré, Edwin & Perko, Tanja & Thijssen, Peter, 2017. "Public opinion change after the Fukushima nuclear accident: The role of national context revisited," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 124-133.
    4. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "The Economics of Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism: A Survey (Part I)," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1049, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. W. Viscusi, 2009. "Valuing risks of death from terrorism and natural disasters," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 191-213, June.
    6. W. Viscusi & Richard Zeckhauser, 2006. "National survey evidence on disasters and relief: Risk beliefs, self-interest, and compassion," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 13-36, September.
    7. Thomann, Christian & Schulenburg, J.-Matthias, 2006. "Supply and Demand for Terrorism Insurance: Lessons from Germany," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-340, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    8. David Fielding & Anja Shortland, 2009. "Does television terrify tourists? Effects of US television news on demand for tourism in Israel," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 245-263, June.
    9. Rudisill, Caroline & Costa-Font, Joan & Mossialos, Elias, 2012. "Behavioral adjustment to avian flu in Europe during spring 2006: The roles of knowledge and proximity to risk," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1362-1371.
    10. Tal Shavit, 2013. "The effect of optimism bias on time preference," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 2(3), pages 128-133.
    11. Bozzoli, Carlos & Müller, Cathérine, 2011. "Perceptions and attitudes following a terrorist shock: Evidence from the UK," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(S1), pages 89-106.
    12. Uri Benzion & Shosh Shahrabani & Tal Shavit, 2009. "Emotions and perceived risks after the 2006 Israel–Lebanon war," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 8(1), pages 21-41, June.
    13. Thomann, Christian & Pascalau, Razvan & Schulenburg, J.-Matthias Graf von der & Gas, Bruno, 2007. "Corporate Management of Highly Dynamic Risks: The Case of Terrorism Insurance in Germany," MPRA Paper 7221, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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